Private Practice Building and New Patient Calls

In Private Practice Building, Prioritize Calls from New Patients

All your private practice building efforts will go down the drain if you don’t train your staff on how to receive calls from new patients.

It’s true that we recently talked about the importance of focusing on your existing patients for private practice building—keeping them truly happy so they keep coming back for more.

But there is an element of private practice building that is equally important and shouldn’t be overlooked.

Too often, private practice owners think that if they’ve got a great marketing campaign out there, then the calls will roll in. But what if calls come in from prospective patients, and your staff doesn’t handle them appropriately?

The first phone call is the missing link between your efforts at private practice building and the scheduling of new patients. Your marketing isn’t “done” until the new patient walks out the door after their first (wonderful) visit.

That’s why it’s so important to train your staff on the exact procedure you want them to use in responding to new patient calls.

The first line of defense is to make sure you have at least two team members behind the desk at ALL times. That’s because it’s inevitable that new patients will call when a lone staffer is interacting in person with existing patients. What you don’t want is for that person to have to answer the phone and put that new patient on hold! How many people do you think will wait for more than a few seconds before hanging up?

There’s another vital component of how new patient calls affect your private practice building success, and it lies within the phone conversion skills of your staff. Remember, simply answering the phone and making an appointment isn’t good enough.

Your staff has to be able to make the new patient feel appreciated and special from the first moment in the call, and your staff also has to be able to effectively answer any questions that the new patient may have about your private practice.

How well would your staff do on the new patient call test?