Mobile Marketing for Private Practice Owners

Private Practice SEO: What You Need to Know

In private practice, SEO is vital to understand. Here’s what you need to know about search engine optimization for your business.

As a private practice owner, you know that getting high-quality traffic to your website is important for new referrals and your professional reputation. But you may have been tempted to think, “I don’t have to understand that keyword stuff. I can leave the private practice SEO mumbo-jumbo to my website guy.”

This is a huge mistake. Sure, let your website guy handle the tech details, but as the owner and director of your private practice, SEO and keyword optimization are ultimately up to you.

The good news is, even if sometime it seems that private practice SEO is a tricky business, the basic components are fairly easy to understand.

What it all comes down to is that the best private practice website in the world is totally useless if patients can’t find it.

Here are a few of the most basic concepts behind private practice SEO. There are a lot of great guides out there online (and, of course, a lot of trash as well), but this will get you started in getting your business onto Google’s first page of results for your keyword.

The right SEO keyword phrase

First, you’ll need to make sure that you optimize for the keyword phrase that will bring the right search traffic to your site. In general, it needs to be local and specific, such as “Baltimore physical therapist.” You’ll need to do keyword research with a tool like Google Adwords—what sounds like a great keyword phrase to you may not be what potential patients are actually typing into the search bar.

Using your keyword often enough (but not too often)

You want your keyword to appear throughout your site. If not, search engines won’t pay attention. On the other hand, using a keyword too often, an outdated practice known as “keyword stuffing,” is the worst thing you can do for private practice SEO and will actually harm your chances of Google ranking your site highly.

Active content on your website

Having a private practice blog or adding regularly to a library of informative topic-based articles is a great way to keep your site fresh. It’s also an opportunity to add in keywords in appropriate places, and search engines will notice. Just make sure that you’re adding quality content that new patients will want to read.

Fast loading times

Don’t let your web designer make your site too Flash-heavy. These kinds of applications make your site look great, but they increase the time it takes for the site to load. That will hurt you in terms of private practice SEO results, and it may also drive away the traffic that you’re working so hard to attract.

Private practice SEO can be tricky to get right, and it’s an ever-changing target. That’s why it’s important to stay up-to-date and become part of a network of private practice owners who get regular training on essential business concepts.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

Private Practice Website Mistakes You Should Avoid At All Costs

Your private practice website is so much more than a professional calling card. Does your site measure up to patient expectations?

The worst mistake you can make as a private practice owner is to stop marketing when your practice is comfortably full. And the very worst kind of marketing slump nearly always involves your private practice website.

Maybe you don’t have a website at all. Maybe there’s a rudimentary site in place, but it’s not complete. Or maybe you set it up so long ago that the site is visually outdated. Any of these problems will turn away new patients in a heartbeat.

Patients know that effective private practice owners maintain an active, up-to-date website. Not just a fancy business card with one phone number and an auto-link to Mapquest in lieu of directions to the office.

Today’s patients are web savvy, and their expectations are high. They expect your site to be interactive, allowing them to schedule their appointment online. They expect to get a clear sense of who you are as a specialist—more than just a generic headshot (or worse, a blurry snapshot of your staff). They’re looking for a blog or a library of informative articles.

Does your site measure up?

Remember, your website is either actively attracting your ideal patients, or it’s driving them away. There is no neutral ground.

If you don’t have an effective and engaging website, it’s a sure bet that one of your competitors does have one… and that’s where your potential new patients are going, right after they click away from your site.
How does your website measure up to the best of what’s out there?

Like any other aspect of private practice, your website is not an area in which you can effectively go it alone. Isn’t it time to seek out a mentor for those areas of private practice where you’re weakest?

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

 

Benefits of a Staff-Driven Private Practice

The Benefits of Creating a Staff-Driven Private Practice

Make Your Private Practice Sing By Training Your Staff To Take Charge of Practice Success. Here’s Why.

Yes, you’re the CEO and executive director of your private practice. But smart private practice owners seek to create a practice in which their entire team—including every staff member—takes an active, autonomous role in building and maintaining the practice.

In this type of  practice, the owner provides daily and weekly instructions to staff simply as a means of coordinating efforts, rather than as external motivation to do their jobs.

For this system to work, you need a trustworthy and competent staff in which every member has been fully trained on their job duties AND on the mission of your private practice. This kind of staff member doesn’t simply show up, do their assigned duties, and leave. They are an integral part of the success of the practice because they create and expand the job every day.

In a private practice that is staff-driven, all staff members share equally in the responsibility and positive energy of daily struggles and triumphs in the office.

Some of the benefits of a staff-driven private practice include:

  • Increased morale. Staff members will worker harder and smarter when they understand and support the vision of your practice. They’ll have a sense of belonging that leads them to take pride in their work and innovate new ideas and solutions as needed.
  • Improved work-life balance for you as the private practice owner. Without a staff-driven practice, you’ll find yourself feeling like a stagecoach driver flogging a tired horse. When your office runs smoothly and on its own volition, taking direction from you on improvements and growth rather than relying on you for motivation to produce simply average results, you’ll be able to spend more of your time on the rest of your life outside the office.
  • Building for the future. It’s short-sighted to focus only on this quarter and this year. What about ten years in the future? What about retiring and selling your private practice? When you’ve built a staff-driven practice, you’ll be able to step away without the entire practice crumbling—and that means you’ll have a valuable asset when you’re ready to sell.

You may wonder how to get to this point from where you are now. What kind of hiring, managing, and executive direction skills are needed to build a staff-driven private practice?

invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

Benefits of a Staff-Driven Private Practice

Private Practice Owners Must Understand This Key Idea About Staff Morale

Many Private Practice Owners Don’t Know How to Keep Their Staff Members Productive. The Answer Is Simple.

Like so many other private practice owners, you’ve worked hard to build your staff. After going to all of the expense and trouble of hiring and training support staff who are competent and trustworthy, you’d like to keep them on as long as possible.

But how can you do that? What really keeps private practice staff happy and productive?

The key lies in customer service… in which your staff is your number one customer.

Yes, it’s true that without patients, there would be no private practice. In that sense, the customer comes first. But consider where you’d be without that dedicated staff. How could you serve patients then?

If you make sure to devote time and energy to keeping your staff morale high—not just occasionally, but every day—you will find that you’ll keep patients coming back, too. A happy staff is a welcoming, attentive staff, and patients will notice the difference.

So what are some concrete ways that private practice owners can keep their staff members satisfied and productive?

Say “thank you.” Not occasionally, not just at staff meetings, but in every moment possible. Verbalize your appreciation every chance you get, in big (formal) ways and small (informal) ways. Build in a reward system for meeting productivity goals. Private practice owners who want to prosper make their staff feel valued.

Ask for employee input, and actually take it into consideration. Your staff has an intimate knowledge of what makes their work environment positive—and what makes their professional lives difficult. Find multiple ways to invite input, both public and private. When staff raise a good idea, implement it!

Get to know the personal lives and preferences of individual staff members. Learn their birthdays, the names of their spouses and children and dogs, and their favorite sports teams. Spell their names correctly in memos—you’d be surprised how many private practice owners don’t bother with this detail!

Don’t assume that staff are happy in their current positions or even career fields. If you are having conversations with staff (formal and informal) about their career goals and hopes for the future, you’ll be able to support them in relevant milestones. Just as important, you won’t be caught off guard by a sudden career change.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

 

Private Practice Owners, Tell Your Patients What to Do

You Need Cash Patients in Your Private Practice—But How Do You Draw Them In?

Attracting new patients who are willing to pay cash for services is the future of private practice. Here’s what you need to know about how to get and keep private pay customers.

Here is the hard reality of running a cash-based private practice. Patients who pay up front for services, almost without exception, expect you to be an expert. Not just an expert in your field, but an expert who focuses on the precise problem they are experiencing.

In other words, if you want to attract cash-paying patients to your private practice, your advertising needs to target patients with specific conditions. The fact is that if you don’t highly focus your marketing to attract specific types of cash patients, you’ll be competing with all of the other generalists out there—and you are unlikely to succeed over time.

To bring in more cash-based patients to your private practice, you need to do four things:

1. Identify a profitable niche that is in demand in your area. It is critical to distinguish yourself from all other specialists in your area, and make sure that you’re not just offering the same broad menu of potential services as every other private practice out there. But it has to be something that people want and will pay out of pocket to receive.

2. Know the demographics and psychographics of the patients you want to attract within that niche. It does no good to pick a marketing niche if you haven’t paid attention to the available data about exactly WHO is reading and responding. Psychology is everything in marketing a private practice.

3. Effectively use the appropriate marketing channels, including social media and articles on your own private practice website, to get noticed by these patients. Too many private practice owners are frightened of social media, blogging, and other current-day means of advertising. The fact is, things like postcard mailings and phone book listings just don’t have the same impact and may even be a waste of your advertising dollars—especially if that’s all you’re doing.

4. Provide such top-rate service to new clients, including both clinical interactions and customer service, that they will speak positively of you to others and actively refer friends and family. This is the bottom line. It’s not enough to get new patients in the door. They have to have such a great experience that they can’t wait to come back. There is nothing more powerful than social proof, so focus on getting the patients you want and making them want to share what they know about your services.

If all of this seems overwhelming, that’s because effective marketing is a huge job for private practice owners. But we can help! For support and training around marketing and other private practice concerns, read about our Mentoring and Coaching programs.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

 

Private Practice Owners Must Avoid This Practice-Killing Marketing Error

For Private Practice Owners, These Deadly Sins of Marketing Could Topple Your Profitable Business 

Private practice owners often do it all. In addition to clinical work with patients, they juggle office management, administrative tasks, payroll, and customer service. Marketing might seem to fall pretty far down on the list.

Without effective marketing, though, your private practice won’t be around long. Private practice owners can’t afford to ignore the realities of marketing in today’s business environment.

What worked 20 or 50 years ago, perhaps even 5 to 10 years ago, simply won’t cut it today.

I see so many private practice owners whose marketing strategies are practically doomed because of three simple but damaging mistakes:

  • Focusing the advertising message on you as the provider—your credentials, training, clinical equipment, or areas of interest—rather than on the patient’s immediate needs.
  • Simply listing data or jargon related to office equipment or procedures, as if the average reader will know or care what these things mean.
  • Detailing every single thing that you offer to every kind of customer, so that no one thing stands out among the rest (and you look like every provider out there).

So, let’s take a look at the opposites of these major errors, so that you can determine what you SHOULD do to improve your advertising efforts. In sum, effective marketing for private practice owners must include these key factors:

  • Targeting a specific type of service to a limited audience
  • Making the advertising message about the customer, not about you as the service provider
  • Explaining exactly why and how your state-of-the-art equipment will benefit the customer

Following these three very effective tenets of marketing will take you far beyond your current advertising efforts.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

Your Private Practice Needs Serious Help

Why Your Private Practice Needs Serious Help

If Your Private Practice Management Approach is “Going It Alone,” You Will Almost Certainly Go Down With the Ship.

In this society, we get a lot of messages about independence and self-reliance. You may have imagined that running a private practice would be a wonderful experience of autonomy, as you make every decision about how to make your business thrive.

And it’s true that all of these decisions are yours.

But are you thriving in the self-reliance model of private practice?

Are you honestly capable of doing an excellent (not average) job of every component of your business, from clinical work serving patients to front-end customer service to bookkeeping and practice management?

You already know that it takes a reliable and trustworthy staff to accomplish these things. You’re not a one-man band. But (to continue the musical metaphor) you are indeed the conductor who leads this orchestra.

That’s where many medical practititioners in private practice make a costly mistake—trying to do it all.

Smart private practice owners understand their limitations and find a way to support themselves in those areas of weakness. As the owner and director of a private medical practice, you will be able to deliver consistently excellent service to your customers and staff by seeking help with aspects of business that are less familiar to you.

There’s nothing wrong with seeking help—serious help. By that, I mean assistance from a proven leader who has years of experience in the very aspects of business that you are currently struggling with.

So what’s the next step to getting serious help for your private practice? Let us provide consulting help to aid you in avoiding costly mistakes in your business. With years of experience in practice management and practice building, we can be your guide along the path of making your practice truly thrive.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

Mobile Marketing for Private Practice Owners

Private Practice Owners Cannot Afford to Ignore Social Media

You might be wary of getting involved in social media or feel confused about the best way to implement a social media strategy. But every private practice owner should understand the place of social media in marketing.

Almost without exception, your patients are online.

Are you?

I don’t just mean having a website or even a blog. If you’re not using social media—and using it to effectively promote your private practice—you are missing out on a willing audience.

These days, a patient’s first encounter with you happens long before they arrive for the first visit at your office—or even before they pick up the phone to speak with your staff about a consultation.

When you’ve established a reputation on social media, you will have won a new patient’s trust long before you actually meet in person. And the best thing about social media is that few medical professionals in private practice are using it. In part, that’s because they’re scared of “doing it wrong.”

But when you have a social media strategy in place, and you’re in control of the online impression you leave with potential patients, you’ll see that no private practice can survive for long while ignoring the impact of social media on marketing today.

There is no substitute for a strong online presence as a way of building your perceived authority. The fact is, an active and engaging social media presence will take your private practice to unimagined new heights—when you do it effectively. There are many examples out there of ineffective social media practices.

Too often, private practice owners avoid the social media question altogether… or they jump in headfirst, without a clear understanding of what they’re doing and why. You could even say that a misguided and muddled social media strategy is almost worse than totally avoiding getting involved at all.

That’s why a private practice mentor is essential for the success of your business as a medical professional. You are highly trained in your field and a stellar clinician… but what training have you had in marketing, administration, and other aspects of running a business?

When you’re ready to take your private practice to a higher level, let us know. We can provide the tools you need to increase your marketing reach and design a private practice that suits the life you want to create.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

 

SWOT analysis for physical therapy business

How to Strengthen Your Physical Therapy Business Plan with a SWOT Analysis

Use a SWOT Analysis to Help Grow Your Physical Therapy Business and Avoid Significant Pitfalls.

Have you taken the time to do a thorough SWOT analysis for your physical therapy business? If so, have you done it again recently?

This tool could make all the difference in the effectiveness of your marketing strategy and many other key components leading to the success of your practice.

Here is a quick overview of SWOT analysis and how it applies to a successful physical therapy business.

SWOT stands for: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats. The first two are internal factors, and the second two are external factors. Although you may not be able to have complete control over each factor, it’s useful to identify all components and know how they are impacting your physical therapy business.

Strengths are any resources or capabilities that give you an edge over competitors. These can include factors such as the unique aspects of the service you provide; the geographic location of your physical therapy business, if it is a positive factor; and any special training or knowledge you have gained that is not available from most other providers.

Weaknesses are often the lack of strength in a particular area. Specifically, you might lack business training in certain areas, such as marketing. Or your physical therapy business might not offer products or services that are distinct from those of your competition.

Opportunities refer to factors that provide a chance to develop or expand the patient base for your physical therapy business. These might include new services you could offer, a partnership with similar providers to increase referrals, or the lack of significant competition in a particular market.

Threats are important not to overlook. Even though you may not be able to directly control a threat, it will certain impact your physical therapy business for the worse if not somehow addressed in your overall strategy for success. Threats can include anything from regulation changes to competitors with innovative services that address the needs of YOUR patients.

Keep in mind that a SWOT analysis is a subjective process. It’s a good idea to have a SWOT analysis performed by a third party who can provide an objective look at your physical therapy business. Then you can compare your internal SWOT with this other feedback and decide how to implement what you’ve learned.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

 

Private Practice Owners, Tell Your Patients What to Do

Marketing For Your Specialty Practice: How to Address What Patients Truly Want

Are You Trying To Market Your Specialty Practice By Focusing On All The Wrong Elements?

Too often, specialty practice owners spend valuable time and money on marketing that doesn’t work—usually because the language and focus of their marketing just isn’t what potential patients want.

It’s so easy to get caught up in wanting to draw attention to your specialized training, or the fancy new equipment you’ve invested in, or the wide array of services you can provide. But frankly, patients are shopping for a specific experience.

They don’t want to purchase dental work.
They want to feel more confident because of a dazzling smile.

They don’t want to pay for 30 minutes of treatment with a specially trained chiropractor.
They want relief from chronic lower back pain.

They don’t want to read the resume of a physical therapist.
They want to be able to stand fully upright without discomfort.

They don’t want to invest in an invasive surgery to ameliorate neuropathic pain.
They want to be able to weed the garden, knit, and do the Sunday crossword without burning and tingling in their dominant hand.

To effectively market your specialty practice, you will have to identify the true motivators for your patients.

Here are some of the strongest motivators that drive patients to pursue treatment at a specialty practice:

  • Relief from pain
    Improvement in their physical appearance
    Increased sense of confidence
    Ability to remain productive in activities that are meaningful to them
    Feeling in control of their health and at peace with medical decisions they make

When the marketing message for your specialty practice addresses one or more of these core motivators, you will see a higher return on investment for your advertising dollar.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

Demographics and Psychographics in Chiropractic Practice Building

Chiropractic Practice Building Success Rests on Understanding Psychographics

In chiropractic practice building, knowing how to address both demographics and psychographics can make all the difference in marketing to the right patients.

Are you clear on the difference between demographics and psychographics—and how to use both in your marketing strategy for chiropractic practice building?

Here’s a breakdown of these basic concepts and how to apply them to your own promotional strategies.

In short, demographics are facts that describe characteristics of your current patients as well as prospective ones. These facts are things like gender, income level, age, marital status, education level, occupation, homeowner status, age and gender of children in the home, and location of the home and/or workplace. These are external facts that we can easily see and quantify.

On the other hand, psychographics are more difficult to discern because they are based on patterns of behavior. This means that psychographics are actually very valuable in chiropractic practice building, because they look at the psychology of your current and potential patients. Psychographics can include things like hobbies, buying patterns, lifestyle choices, political leanings, and personal values.

If you want to know WHO pays for your services, look at demographics. If you want to know WHY they do it—and for the purposes of chiropractic practice building, you definitely want to know this—then psychographics will be even more helpful.

Demographic information is relatively easy to obtain. For psychographics, though, you’ll need to interact directly with your target market to learn about their attitudes, buying choices, and lifestyle preferences. You can start by surveying your current patients, who can provide a wealth of information about why they continue to choose your chiropractic office over other options.

When you have psychographic data, you’ll have a very powerful tool for chiropractic practice building. It’s nearly useless to collect demographic data about your target market if you don’t also take a close look at the psychology of patients’ decision-making. Think about the difference between knowing how many current patients have referred others to your practice, and knowing precisely WHY they chose to do so.

An effective mix of demographics and psychographics allows you to tailor your marketing strategy to a specific group of people and to make sure your promotional messages address the particular needs of those people. And that means they are far more likely to become patients at your practice. That’s the bottom line in chiropractic practice building.

 

Private Practice and the New Word of Mouth Process

The Right Way to Market Your Physical Therapy Business

When It Comes to Promoting Your Physical Therapy Business, There’s Good News and Bad News.

Too many physical therapy business owners spend a lot of time fretting about the “right” way to handle marketing. After all, there is so much advice out there—and most of it is contradictory.

How is a physical therapy business owner supposed to know what’s right for his or her practice?

In the end, it’s a trick question.

There are only two WRONG ways to formulate your physical therapy marketing plan.

The first wrong way is to halfheartedly do too many things, and none of them effectively or with a strategy. It’s too easy to get sucked into spending tons of time on social media without knowing exactly why you’re there, or to divide four marketing hours into six different efforts with little return on your time investment. It’s essential to choose your promotional strategies carefully and always with a measurable end goal in mind.

The second wrong way is to do nothing at all in terms of marketing your physical therapy business, either because you’re “too busy” or because you’re scared of getting it wrong.

So… the bad news about marketing for your physical therapy business is this: Chances are, the way you’re doing it right now is NOT as effective as it could be.

And the good news? Small increments of effective change can work wonders for your marketing strategy.

You may want to take a close look at what you’re doing to promote your physical therapy business and what you expect to gain from it in measurable terms. Then consider whittling down your efforts to the one or two things that have shown the best ROI thus far—and really put your back into those one or two things to see even greater returns.

Or, if you’re guilty of total marketing inaction, it’s not too late to start effectively marketing your physical therapy business. What one audience are you trying to reach, and what do you hope to gain from connecting with them? Start there with just a few hours a week of focused promotion.

Effective marketing is essential to the success of your physical therapy business—yet you probably didn’t get any training in this vital skill when you were in school!

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

Healthcare Changes and Your Specialty Practice

Specialty Practice Can Benefit from the New Competitive Patient Mindset

Recent changes in the healthcare landscape can provide a boost to growth in your specialty practice—if you have the right goals in mind.

Many specialty practice owners have been viewing new healthcare laws and systems in the United States with a mixture of fear, outrage, and dismay.

You may be wondering how all these changes will affect your private practice… and assuming that things will be changing for the worse. How can a specialty practice possibly survive in this environment?

If you’ve been viewing healthcare changes as a circumstance that will doom your specialty practice, it’s time to think again.

Why? Because all of these changes can actually HELP you to grow your specialty practice to its upper limit—as long as you have the right mindset about the direction you’re headed.

All of these healthcare law changes have caused a shift in the typical patient mindset. It used to be that patients would do whatever their doctor said to do, or have whatever procedure was covered as standard by their insurance company.

These days, self-pay patients are looking at value. They want the most bang for their buck. That means they’re shopping around and looking for the provider who will provide exceptional care that justifies the cost of services. They view provider rates as an investment in their long-term health, and they want a good return on their investment.

This is great news! This patient, who is discerning and makes an informed decision when choosing a specialty practice, is exactly the kind of patient that you need to attract and keep in order to make your specialty practice thrive.

You don’t want patients who follow the old episodic treatment model: coming into the office when they’re in pain and then falling away. You want patients who seek expert collaboration and a long-term relationship working toward their continuing health. That patient is the very picture of loyalty, and he or she will joyfully refer you to family and friends.

When your patients are focused on their long-term health, then the long-term health of your specialty practice will be a given.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

3 Mistakes in Private Practice Building

Private Practice Building Mistakes: 3 Self-Sabotaging Behaviors That Will Kill Your Private Practice

Most People Are Making These 3 Private Practice Building Mistakes. Are You?

We’ve all heard about “self-sabotaging” behaviors—in our personal lives, in the context of career advice, and maybe in terms relationships. But did you know that there are self-sabotaging behaviors in the world of private practice building?

These attitudes and actions can be devastating to the health of your private practice. Why? Because in business, and particularly in the area of private practice building, the definition of self-sabotaging behaviors is anything that gets in the way of your long-term business goals.

Are you guilty of getting in your own way when it comes to private practice building? Of course, none of us are doing it perfectly… but the key is to be doing it effectively, and to avoid the major pitfalls.

Here are the top 3 self-sabotaging behaviors in private practice building, and suggestions for how you can avoid them.

#1: Waiting for the perfect moment

Sometimes we get so focused on taking action “at the right moment” that our perfectionism gets in the way of business growth.

In truth, ANY action—no matter how small—is better in the long term than continued inaction. In other words, when you don’t act, your lack of action is a choice that plays against your business goals.

#2: Micromanaging your team

You’re the captain of this ship, so of course you want to make sure you’ll stay on course. It’s tempting to try to accomplish this way-finding by being on top of your staff day in and day out, watching them like a hawk. But from a long-term view, this leads to resentment and high turnover—not the results you want in private practice building!

A better approach is to make your presence known in every area of your business, but in a manner that emphasizes your trust in your staff. Your team will feel that you’re involved and aware of their issues without the stranglehold of micromanaging.

#3: Trying to get all of your business learning from books

You know the importance of learning and growing in your private practice building efforts. Too often, though, you probably rely on reading books and articles as your main source of information.

Reading is certainly a convenient way to approach continuing education, since you can fit it into your schedule as needed. But there are a number of problems with this approach to private practice building. The main issue is that books and articles about private practice are aimed at a very general audience, and they detail someone else’s techniques for private practice building—which may not be applicable to your business or your unique situation as a private practice owner.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

follow-ups in private practice

The Power of Personal Follow-Ups to Build Your Private Practice: How to Use Personalized Marketing in a Digital World

You’ll have an edge on your competition when you follow up consistently and personally with your patients.

It’s a sad fact that most private practice owners don’t bother to follow up with their patients—and those who do, often are following up in an impersonal way. That’s bad news for those business owners, but it means you have a golden opportunity to tweak your practice follow-up to be more personal and therefore more effective.

Follow-up opportunities happen constantly, and many of them take place before your patient even walks out the door. For example, when your reception staff is checking out a patient after the visit, that’s a prime chance to get feedback. Does your staff inquire personally how the visit went and if there’s anything they can do for your patient? Does your staff direct the patient to a comment card? Or do they just not ask for feedback at all? You can get very strong and detailed feedback immediately after a visit, which is more valuable to your practice.

Now let’s consider post-visit follow-up. Imagine that a new patient has a consultation with you on Monday morning, but this person doesn’t make an additional appointment at the desk—she says to your staff that she will schedule an appointment later. Does your staff know how to handle a situation like this? Do they tell you about it in a timely way, or do they passively wait for the patient to call the office? Do you expect your staff to follow up with new patients or do you personally reach out to these patients with a phone call?

Just for a moment, put yourself in that patient’s shoes. Which scenario makes you feel special and cared for? Which scenario makes you feel ignored and like a number instead of a person? There’s a frequently quoted aphorism attributed to Maya Angelou: People forget what you do or what you said, but they never forget how you made them feel.

When patients feel that you care about them, they come back, and they refer family and friends. And that’s the bottom line of private practice building.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team 

Arachnoiditis

What is Arachnoiditis and How Can You Help?

As a specialty practice emphasizing the relief of chronic pain, you will encounter patients who suffer from arachnoiditis.

Unfortunately the number of these cases is growing by leaps and bounds.

The cause is thought to be at least in a large part due to the rising use of intraspinal injections.

As we both know, now a days and too often intraspinal injections are used as a first-line rather than the last line therapy for back pain, radiculitis etc.

The net result can be patients who are injured, or suffer severe adverse reactions.

These reactions can range from chronic back pain to unrelenting extremity and spine pain and even paralysis.

There is some concern that preservatives as well as the variety of drugs used in intraspinal injections can cause autoimmune reactions, which can lead to the development of more serious conditions including chemical hypersensitivity.

But the worst effect of course is, the chronic and debilitating and unrelenting pain that these patients suffer from.

As one of our trained clinicians, though you have tools right at your fingertips, which may be able to help even the most difficult patients.

Arachnoiditis patients present cases that will test all of your skills.

You need to of course be sure to start with a very thorough evaluation. Depending upon your expertise, develop a rational but powerful treatment plan using all the tools we have given you. Alternatively refer to one of your colleagues better equipped and trained to help these patients.

There is even a place for lifestyle and behavioral therapies in the treatment of the arachnoiditis patient. This is of course due to the significant life destruction they have experience.

Commonly, your office can serve as an oasis for these patients providing all types of information, which they are not getting anywhere else.

If you’re not familiar with arachnoiditis, we will be providing our clients additional continuing education material on this.

If you thought Neuropathy patients were challenging, you haven’t seen anything until you tackle some of these cases.

The good news is you can offer help to many of these patients.

But the first thing to do is start reaching out in your own practice and in your own community!

Communicate the value of what you are doing a daily basis.

Emphasize the need for a rational conservative approach to spine pain and possible arachnoiditis prevention, doing all of this despite traditional pain clinics emphasis on invasive and potentially dangerous injection therapy.

Above all, expand your expertise and learn to truly help the arachnoiditis patient.

We wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join our team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

Loyal Patients in Private Practice

Diabetic Neuropathy Patients

Treating Patients With Diabetic Neuropathy

If you treat Diabetic Neuropathy Patients chances are you are no stranger to making diagnoses of neuropathy. While some patients (even those who do have nerve damage) might experience no symptoms at all, about 60 to 70 percent of diabetics experience pain, soreness, loss of sensation, tingling in the extremities, and even digestive problems—or other conditions related to organ complications—all symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Diabetic Neuropathy is one of the most common causes of neuropathy overall.

A patient’s risk of developing diabetes-related neuropathy actually increases with age and extenuating health considerations (such as being overweight), partially because patients who have problems with glucose control for extended periods of time—25 years or more—are more susceptible.

So, what causes Diabetic Neuropathy symptoms? Research is occasionally unclear on the subject, but it is generally agreed that exposure to high blood glucose (high blood sugar) has a negative effect on nerve condition. Of course, this is in addition to other conditions or lifestyle factors commonly associated with causing or exacerbating diabetic neuropathy, such as injury, metabolic inconsistencies, inherited traits, or substance abuse.

There are a few kinds of neuropathy associated with diabetes, the most common being peripheral neuropathy (this is the type usually referred to when people simply say “neuropathy” but we’ll get to the other types in a moment). Peripheral neuropathy is characterized by pain, numbness, tingling, and loss of motor function, among other sensation-related symptoms. This type is written about extensively, and can greatly impact quality of life for its sufferers. Most treatments available to medical practitioners target peripheral neuropathy the good news is, there are plenty of ways for you to treat this type.

Focal and proximal Diabetic Neuropathy result in muscle weakness and pain, and typically target a specific nerve grouping. These types of neuropathy are commonly characterized by weakness in the legs, causing difficulty standing and walking. This type of neuropathy often accompanies peripheral neuropathy, so be on the lookout for patients who experience weakness alongside loss of sensation or soreness.

Autonomic neuropathy, as the name implies, causes changes in autonomic bodily functions. These include bowel and bladder functions, sexual responses, and digestion. Autonomic neuropathy can be life-threatening in extreme cases, as it also affects nerves that serve the heart, lungs, and eyes. Especially troubling to diabetic patients is the resulting condition of hypoglycemia unawareness, which can reduce the symptoms most diabetics associate with low glucose.

It is recommended for any diabetic patients to receive at least an annual foot exam. If neuropathy has already been diagnosed, a patient’s feet should be examined much more frequently. Additional to diabetic amputation concerns, you should test your patient’s protective sensation by pricking their foot with a pin, or running monofilament across their skin. If your patient has lost protective sensation, he or she could be at risk to develop sores that might not heal properly, leading to infection. If you have any questions about the proper methods to use in examining diabetic patients for neuropathy, contact NeuropathyDR®. We can be sure you have the tools and knowledge you need!

For other types of neuropathy, properly-trained clinicians should perform a check of heart rate variability to detect how a patient’s heart rate changes in response to changes in blood pressure and posture. Ultrasound imaging is also useful to diagnose autonomic neuropathies and to ensure other internal organs such as the kidneys and bladder are functioning properly.

To control diabetic neuropathy, it is important to advise patients to maintain a tight blood sugar control and a healthy diet (this methodology is advisable for diabetics in general, of course). Even if a patient does not have symptoms of neuropathy, regular checkups are wise. NeuropathyDR® can train you to spot warning signs of factors that could endanger your patients’ nerve function or even be life-threatening. In addition, we can help you treat pain symptoms by providing valuable information about appropriate medications.

If your patients have diabetes, they are at risk! Don’t let neuropathic symptoms go unchecked. Remember, the sooner neuropathy is diagnosed, the easier it will be to treat and to slow the progression of this degenerative condition. Our NeuropathyDR® clinicians are trained to identify the various types of neuropathy and recommend the treatments that help their patients retain their quality of life.

If you have any questions about specialty practice development for chronic pain including diabetic Neuropathy GO TO: NeuropathyDRProfessionals.com

We wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

 

 

Private Practice Building And Your Reputation

Private Practice Building & Reputation Defense

As a private practice owner, just like in any business you need to be very concerned about malicious attacks both on and off-line, most especially in the online arena.

Unless you have systems in place to monitor how your name, your intellectual assets, as well as your practice reputation are defended, you could find yourself doing damage control.

Like it or not it is so easy for the disgruntled patient, perhaps even a competitor or someone you don’t even know to launch malicious attacks against your good work.

Of course we’ve all heard about password theft as well as other online theft. Now I think that private practice owners are particularly easy targets because we often simply are not monitored and thus not protected. This becomes even more important as you develop more places where you were visible online, most especially the social media.

But let’s start with some basics. How often do you search for yourself, and any business or personal assets you have online?

This is a particularly good starting point and it is something we recommend all private practice members such as yourself, be doing on a regular basis. There are also good paid services you may want to consider investing in for reputation defense as well.

This has become such a serious issue, as even paid defense services sometimes are not fool-proof.

 

We wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

practice building advice

Customer Service Goes Beyond Serving Patients

You may think your private practice is pretty good at customer service for patients. But you can take it to a whole new level when your staff learns to serve each other.

Do you know a lot about customer service? It’s definitely the bottom line when it comes to marketing a private practice. But what you may not realize is that customer service isn’t just for patients and new prospects.

Imagine a world in which your staff treats EACH OTHER like valued customers. A world where you’re able to retain staff and keep morale at a steady high.

You can create that world! And your patients will sense a positive shift in your practice culture—which will keep them coming back.

A private practice with a customer service culture has several elements working for it, which you can easily begin to emulate.

First of all, it’s the simplest things that change company culture. “Please” and “thank you” go a long way toward building morale and helping every staff member feel valued. You can suggest at your next staff meeting that everyone remember to use these simple words with each other, not just with clients. But more importantly, you can model this new behavior for your staff. They’ll do what you do, not what you say.

Second, practice listening with respect, not impatience. Too often we are so busy and wrapped in details that we barely acknowledge staff with a nod. What if you made it a practice to always make eye contact, listen fully, and value that person’s contribution to your workday in every exchange? You don’t have to do it perfectly, but there’s a good chance that every respectful listening exchange will have a ripple effect among your staff.

Finally, find ways to offer timely feedback, both positive and constructive. Begin building feedback opportunities into the workweek rather than saving them for performance reviews. Most important, be aware that feedback shouldn’t come just from you as the private practice owner, but from staff member to staff member so that they are supporting each other. Teach them to “catch someone doing something right” and provide concrete ways to share those moments.

What have you learned in your practice about customer service? 

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

JPH

Content Marketing for Your Private Practice

Change Your Marketing Mindset to Bring In More Referrals

How to Transform Your Private Practice Marketing to Reach Your Ideal Customer

Do you love marketing?

Most private practice owners think of marketing as a necessary evil—a dreaded chore that must be done in order to get new patients in the door. But you can distinguish yourself with private practice marketing that genuinely attracts new business because of the positive energy you’ve poured into it.

Think of how it feels to walk into a dentist’s office, for example. There are some pretty standard things that you expect because they’re the same in almost every dental office: popular magazines, photos of smiling people on the walls, an easy listening station piped into the waiting room.

But imagine that you walk into a dental office and experience pleasant surprises. What if the dentist stepped out into the waiting room personally to introduce himself and say how nice it was to meet you? What if, at the end of your first appointment, the office staff gave you two $5 gift cards—one for you and one to pass on to a friend? You’d feel that the dentist and his staff truly wanted to connect with you and make your day nicer.

The same can be true of your private practice marketing efforts. When you approach marketing as a pleasant opportunity to make connections with new patients, rather than as a mundane or tiresome duty, your actions will bring in more business.

Here’s one more way to look at it: think of marketing as a form of customer service (for new customers who don’t know you personally yet). Put yourself in the customer’s shoes. Who would you rather have serving you? The tired customer service rep who is merely going through the motions? Or someone who reaches out to you sincerely and asks how to best serve you today?

Patients can tell when your marketing is heartfelt, and when it’s just going through the motions. In private practice marketing, choose to make real connections every time and you’ll enjoy better referrals.

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

JPH