Do You Harness Creative Energy, or Struggle?

All the Great masters throughout the history of time have written about or alluded to tapping into a Higher Power, God, Infinite Wisdom, Universal Mind, or Collective Consciousness: a creative energy!

This might be a source of focus, clarity, and peace far greater than most of us ever seem to touch, much less attain, on a regular basis. Some invisible, intangible, infinite source of wisdom far greater than that most of us ever connect with in most of our daily experiences.

And as healers, do we even acknowledge among ourselves the “Innate Intelligence” any more?

Do we practice in our offices this mindfulness and respect for something far greater than ourselves? And do we teach our patients about harnessing their own “Center”?  Or is this no longer politically correct for us.

In my work with doctors, I call harnessing this power, tapping “Creative Energy”.

Creative Energy is the knowledge base any of us can tap into that will help us solve even the most pressing problems. The problem, though, is too many never drop anchor long enough in a “Safe Harbor” to even remotely accomplish a sense of peace and well being.

Creative Energy IS the source of Ideas, Personal and Professional Growth, and Taking the Next Steps that so many fail to use.

Quite frankly, failing to harness this Creative Energy is why too many practitioners end up with financial or health issues, or worse.

In today’s practice landscape they end up putting out fires, spinning their wheels, and this seems to consume every waking moment! And this is why too many are left frustrated, burned out, or worse.

Just why is this? I firmly believe it is because too many of us fail to have as regular, SCHEDULED parts of our lives that allows us the space, time, and recreation that allows us to tap Creative Energy!

Now, tapping into this is not something that can be forced. Quite the contrary. You can’t just sit on the floor, face the sunrise and demand answers. It only arrives if you are prepared. Well rested.

And have made the space in your head. And your life.

For me, Creative Energy arrives after or during skiing, fishing, boating, running, reading, and motorcycling. Virtually ever day, in season of course, I engage in one or more of these passionately!

Every DAY, we must have a place to retreat to morning and night. Usually this space (your home) is surrounded by things of meaning, with pets and family in close proximity.

Vacations, hobbies you engage in, and things to regularly retreat to when you’re not working.

To do this, you must learn to see as many or more patients in less time.

And in today’s world, have a Specialty Market Domination Strategy in your area.

Get paid what you’re worth. Save and invest in a low stress, safe fashion.

And this is what “Practice by Design”(TM) is all about.

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join Me for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

JPH

Empowering Language and Choices

I often focus on gratitude for good mentors: their powerful lessons, teaching me persistence, even when things get really “stormy”, and empowering me to achieve my goals.

This is the “stuff” that helps bring private practice owners a great lifestyle!

And I really get to thinking about the future of private practices stuck in the models of the past.

No wonder so many struggle while doing some of mankind’s most important work: caring for others
most intimate needs.

Empowering Language and Choices

One of the most overlooked causes of lack of progress in practice, and I respectfully submit life, is what I call the “language of limitation“.

Often, it’s self-talk, cemented in our minds by repeatedly speaking the words.

Too often I hear patients, and even clients say, “I could never…” “That’s so expensive, I can’t…” “You worked out TODAY? Buts it’s so lousy out…” “You charge how much for an exam…?” “Patients write checks for $X-amount? No way…”

See what I mean?

But it has been my experience that when you can clearly communicate the value of your practice and the services that you offer, your patients will be more than willing to pay you for those services. They appreciate what you can do for them, and understand how valuable your services are to their overall health and well-being.

So, as we enter this new week, make sure your language and your choices are empowering you to make better decisions, especially about the style of practice that will give you a fantastic lifestyle too!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join Me for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

JPH

Will You Be Expanding Your Practice in 2017? (Part 1 of 2)

Will you be expanding your practice in 2017?

Fuel prices. Surcharges. Layoffs. Obamacare. Real Estate mortgage cruel jokes. Stupid property declines of the last few years. And now for those needing health care services, its health insurance benefits that are often laughable. $50 co-pays. Deductibles in the thousands of dollars. But, this is the stuff swirling with angst in your patients’ heads, and in some areas of the US and abroad, in differing socioeconomic strata way more than others.

For most practices this is Future Shock!

So, when the patient before you today has little or no insurance benefits, or a third party system gets yanked from your area, are you just continuing to try to sell just an office visit? Or are you thinking big in terms of expanding your practice?

Like I teach my upper level clients, are you and your entire team offering absolutely everything that an office visit and great patient care can create in your patient’s life? Do you have all the tools and systems to really create the practice of the future? Will you be expanding your practice in 2017?

The answer should be obvious.

Do you continue to be only about their “coverage”, or are you really and honestly only about their health? If you are only about their health, does every one of your staff know this, and reinforce it on every visit? Or, do you play games like free services, forgiving co-pays and deductibles, dual fees? I certainly hope not, on ALL the preceding issues.

Instead of games, do you have systems fully in place to deal with all these issues in your patient’s mind?  And what about your team? Without having your doctor’s income, it can be tougher around their homes too these days. If you haven’t fine-tuned each of these areas of your practice, now is the time to make this happen. Expanding your practice in 2017 is possible, you just need to address these issues head on.

You may ask, what is the solution to these issues? We’ll cover some of those in our next post…

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join Me for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

JPH

The Incredible Power of Clarity

If you are not completely happy with the current direction of your practice (which is only a mirror of what’s going on in your life, and respectfully seems too often an epidemic in private practice) there can only be one big reason. And this one requires no diatribe. Simply, that reason for lack of fulfillment is lack of clarity.

Now, lest you think I’m preaching, I’m actually speaking from experience.

You see, I’ve had two very close calls in my life where I had to make some really tough choices. You probably have too. And that being said, you know that during the periods in which we lack a clear vision of our outcome, life and practice of course can be very rocky. 

Unhappiness, sleeplessness, depression, down practice revenues. Focusing on the negatives. Blaming the economy for lack…

Don’t you know that MORE, not less, difficult situations and people are attracted to us in this state? That’s why it’s called the LAW of attraction.

Fortunately, one of my mentors very early on taught me how to recognize this “Death” spiral. And make no mistake, when your spirit dies, you are moving that way.

Also fortunately for me, he taught me how to get out of this self-imposed hell quickly, and get right back on track. If I had not listened to him and practiced exactly what he taught me, I likely would never be writing this to you.

The solution is actually quite simple. It’s execution however is often delayed, sometimes for entire lifetimes.

So here it is.  Get crystal clear on what you want your life to look like, write it out, constantly visualize it throughout the day, work with people that share your dream and hold you accountable and take MASSIVE amounts of ACTION to help make your vision reality.

And, NEVER GIVE UP.

Then, repeat.

That’s it. One paragraph. It really is the secret of the ages.

So, what’s holding YOU back today?

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join Me for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

JPH

Educating and Treating Herniated Disc and Compressive Neuropathy Patients

As a Private Practice professional specializing in neuropathy, you can offer these patients the best chance possible for avoiding permanent nerve damage.

Let’s say you have a patient who presents with[1]

∙           Severe, sharp, electric shock-like, shooting pain

∙           Deep burning or cold in the feet or legs

∙           Numbness, tingling or weakness in the feet and legs that doesn’t go away

∙           Radiating pain down the legs and into the feet

∙           Muscle spasms and deep muscle pain

∙           Depression

∙           Sleeplessness

∙           Fear and anxiety

∙           Inability to perform normal daily activities

∙           Reduced social interaction with friends and family

∙           Loss of bowel and/or bladder control and sexual dysfunction

That’s quite a laundry list of symptoms.  If the patient doesn’t appear to be really physically active or a manual laborer, your first thought probably isn’t going to be a herniated disc.  You might be considering some type of neuropathy but not likely compressive neuropathy caused by a herniated disc.

Doctor and PatientBut maybe you should move both conditions a little farther up the list of possibilities.

To get started, do a thorough history, physical and a complete battery of tests based on their symptoms.  Once you have your diagnosis, you can begin educating and treating your patient.

Explaining What The Discs Do

A well informed patient is a more compliant patient.  If your patient has a desk job and doesn’t engage in any strenuous physical activity, it will be harder for them to understand how they developed a herniated disc and compressive neuropathy.

First, explain to them exactly what the discs do. The bones in the spine are separated and cushioned by small discs that act as shock absorbers. When they function properly, they allow your spine to remain flexible.  But when they’re damaged, which is much more likely as we age, the discs can bulge or rupture and that is what is known as a herniated disc.[2]

Any number of things can cause a herniated disc – plain old fashioned wear and tear, sitting too much or traumatic injury from lifting too much weight and lifting it improperly.

If your patient sits for long periods of time and frequently experienced minor back pain and chronic back tiredness before they came to see you with more advanced symptoms, they are a great candidate for developing a “wear and tear” herniated disc. Something as simple as bending over to pick up a piece of paper, a minor fall or even a sneeze can be all it takes to cause a disc to rupture.

If their job or lifestyle requires them to do frequent heavy lifting and they lift with their back instead of their legs, they’re a herniated disc waiting to happen.  Educate your patient extensively on the proper way to lift to avoid damaging their back in the future.

So…They Understand Herniated Disc But Where Does Compressive Neuropathy Come In?

Here’s a good analogy to use when explaining why herniated discs can causes compressive neuropathy.

Tell them to think of the spine and the nerves that run along the spine like a water hose.  When the hose is running wide open, the flow is smooth and uninterrupted.

Now put a kink in the hose.  The flow of water all but stops.

The herniated disc is the kink in the hose.  It puts pressure on the nerves and stops the proper flow of blood and oxygen and that results in nerve damage.

And nerve damage results in compressive neuropathy, usually in the feet and legs.  If the pressure is not relieved, the damage to the nerves can be permanent and you can end up with life long issues.

Treatment Options

When you’re diagnosed with a herniated disc and compressive neuropathy, the first goals of treatment are:

∙           Pain relief – first and foremost

∙           Address any weakness or numbness in your feet, legs and lower back

∙           Prevention of additional injuries

As a NeuropathyDR® clinician you have access to and training in a specialized protocol that’s ideal for treating the patient with a herniated disc and compressive neuropathy.  A good starting point for treatment is

∙           Bed rest followed by increased, prescribed and controlled activity

∙           Chiropractic manipulation to get the spine back into proper alignment and take pressure     off the herniated disc and nerves

∙           Treatment with the neurostimulation to open up nerve channels and stimulate nerve repair

∙           Exercises to reduce pain and strengthen the muscles in the back

∙           Dietary counseling to address any other underlying medical issues

As a health care professional specializing in neuropathy you can offer these patients the best chance possible for avoiding permanent nerve damage from their herniated disc and the best chance for sparing themselves future pain.

Let us help you reach these patients in your private practice and treat them.

Are You A Licensed Health Care Professional? Grab Your Free NeuropathyDR Professionals Information Kit!

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Autonomic Neuropathy: More Dangerous than You Think

Autonomic Neuropathy: More Dangerous than You Think

If you read our articles often, you know that we usually talk about peripheral neuropathy in terms of the pain and inconvenience it can cause for your patients.  We usually write about quality of life, but it’s also important to know about a much more serious element that can threaten the lives of the people you treat: autonomic neuropathy.

Autonomic neuropathy is the term that means damage has been done to the nerves that control the automatic functions of your body.  These functions include blood pressure, heart rate, bowel and bladder emptying, and digestion.  When the nerves are damaged, these functions can start to behave incorrectly.  It can be dangerous and even life-threatening when this happens.

If your patients are presenting with symptoms of nerve damage like numbness or tingling, loss of motor control, sexual dysfunction, dizziness and sweating, or loss of hot and cold sensation, they may also have more serious damage to the nerves controlling your organs.

Nothing builds a powerful specialty practice like incredible results!

Many cases of autonomic neuropathy accompany cases of peripheral neuropathy that have more easily-noticed symptoms.  With autonomic neuropathy, a patient’s body can have trouble controlling their blood pressure, they might not digest food correctly, or they could have problems regulating their body temperature.  These conditions are dangerous!

Make sure your patients know they could be at serious risk!

Autonomic neuropathy isn’t a disease of its own, and it’s not caused by any one thing.  If your patients  suffer from injuries, have had an amputation, or even spend long amounts of time sitting still, they can be at risk of developing nerve damage.  As you probably know, though, autonomic neuropathy goes along with a disease or condition, such as:

  • Alcoholism
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer (specifically, chemotherapy)
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Lupus

If you work with patients who suffer from any of these conditions, be on the lookout for autonomic neuropathy.   Don’t rule out a patient just because he or she doesn’t have any of the “peripheral” symptoms!  Even if they are symptom-free, a patient might have damage threatening their organs.  We can’t emphasize enough that catching neuropathy early, especially the autonomic kind, gives you more treatment options and is the best way to help your patients.  Don’t forget: we’re talking about a life-threatening condition!

How can you determine if a patient’s organs are in danger?

Ask questions.  Patients can be shy about their lifestyle, exercise, diet, habits, and so on, but they’re the best source of information.  Remind them that you are here to help, not to judge.  It is vital to know any symptoms they might have, or any relevant medications or existing conditions that might contribute to neuropathy.

If you have any questions about how to examine a patient for signs of neuropathy, contact us! NeuropathyDR® has the resources you need to detect autonomic neuropathy early.  Most commonly, an examination of the extremities for infections or sores is a good first step, along with testing for blood pressure irregularities.  For autonomic neuropathy in particular, an ultrasound can help determine if the internal organs are functioning correctly.  There are also a number of other tests that are specific to certain organs such as the bladder, stomach, or lungs.

For autonomic neuropathy, taking the best care of your patient can mean a couple of different treatments used together to keep them healthy.  Several kinds of medications are available which will help slow the effects of nerve damage and reduce the symptoms.  Contact us for guidance on specific medications that might help; it can vary from patient to patient.

It can also be helpful to instruct patients about ways to make your everyday routine more conducive for living with neuropathy (again, NeuropathyDR® is a valuable resource for you in this area).  Patients usually have to adjust their diet, and certain kinds of exercise may be more dangerous to people with neuropathy.  We can help you find the best foods to recommend to your patients, as well as help develop exercise plans that are safe and beneficial to them.

There’s no absolute cure for neuropathy, but becoming a NeuropathyDR® doctor will equip you to help your patients when it comes to keeping them safe from the different kinds of neuropathy.  Remember, don’t wait!  The earlier you catch neuropathy, the better you can help!

 

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/autonomic-neuropathy/DS00544

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000776.htm

http://www.ccjm.org/content/68/11/928.full.pdf+html

 

 

Do You Engage in Dabbling or Mastery?

Very often when I look at a practice and its owners that are really making things happen a very simple fact emerges. Out of every conversation and analysis one simple fact emerges. When I look at productivity and results in all areas of life and practice, it is clear that those who are the happiest, most productive and profitable have engaged completely in one area and department at a time.

Quite simply, from my very first telephone contact with these offices, it becomes readily apparent analysis of every step has taken place behind the scenes.
And quite obviously, they have trained their staff to answer the phone impeccably. Happy, polite, willing to help anyway they can.

Now of course, this is something I regularly do with enjoyment. I can tell so much about a doc and his practice, based upon how the staff answers the phone. Timing, attitude, how questions are handled, are they organized? And are all their tools obviously at their fingertips?

In fact, if your not doing great at the moment, ask three friends to anonymously call your office. Two as new patients with no health insurance. You should listen in. You may however be shocked
When it comes to collections at the counter its “Here’s your options Mrs. Jones, would you like me to put the entire week (month) on the same card?”

Here’s my point. Those who build powerful practices, and indeed personal lives continuously aim to master each area! No, its never perfect, and always requires measurement and attention, but none the less the process is in place via policies, procedures and trainings.

Clinically, it’s also very important to your patients!

It is vital that your patients experience you as a "Master" clinician.

Now in my office, new patients still tell me over 30 years later, “That was the best exam I have ever had in my entire life!”

Why?

Because on each new patient I still insist on a thorough pre-exam presentation by my aides, yes even interns, and from my clinicians complete vitals, thermogram, ROMs with instrumentation, chest and carotids auscultation, VBA screenings in C-Spine cases, abdomen when indicated, on and on.

But why?

It’s because my mentors taught me, and I was smart enough to pay attention, that the most powerful practices are built upon mastery, not dabbling!

As I said in the beginning, one very simple fact emerges – Masters get everything done while dabblers struggle seemingly forever.

I see this principle frequently when something goes wrong in an office.

For example, a doc gets all pumped up over introducing a new service, or technique to the practice. The guy that sold her on it has had really great results, referrals and profitability. Case studies and referrals.

So, she brings IT back to the office, gets the staff all revved up, but in so doing actually takes them off other areas central to the practice, does not allow time for effective marketing or training, and in reality introduces this new procedure in a half hearted way.

So of course, when things don’t turn out right, there must be something wrong with IT.

I’ll give you the antidote to this practice management pandemic, but I’ll warn you in advance, side effects may include nausea and heartburn. Might even cause stronger visceral and emotional reactions.

The antidote is to vow RIGHT NOW to take each area of your practice, each of the 12 Key areas I identify, and set up the time and systems to go back and master each one!

And yes, it is a constant process (which is why frequent staff huddles and meetings are necessary). And recognition that the needs for approaching practice in this way actually expands as you grow.

This is why our 12 secret platinum coaching programs are so powerful, and our practice makeovers are so very effective.

It’s because they force you into detailed analysis and corrective action.

And as you introduce something new, you must devote time to study, implementation, marketing, pricing, and potential rough spots with implementation.

Here are just 5 things on my list that too often get overlooked:

1. Dedicated business owner study, admin and planning time. 2. Dedicated staff time for marketing and admin. 3. No clear instruction or policies for patients. 4. Lack of effective pricing and collecting at the time of service. 5. Ineffectively conveying to the patient everything about your office (from your website to your treatments) that constantly reinforces in their minds they made the right choice!

The docs that pull this off behave emotionally and physically as effective CEOs.

Mastery vs. dabbling. In this world, your choices will be readily apparent.

But so will be the results! A powerful, profitable practice and enviable lifestyle that you so deserve!

For More, Go To:  http://perfectpracticeweb.com/home

Pull Back or Leap Forward in 2012?

Pull Back or Leap Forward in 2012?

A timely perspective on building a phenomenal practice that delivers a lifetime of patient value and permanent income.

Looking back, about 4 years now after first writing about Commanders of Change™ as a progressive new breed of private practice owners, little did I realize how prophetic it would be. Those in private practice we see doing the best even in this brave new world are commanding their own change, and reinventing themselves, and their practices. Despite the outside world. They have indeed learned to Practice by Design ™.

Those having extraordinary difficulty in private practice are instead practicing by default.

Its no secret, things are very different in your patient’s lives now too. More than just an election year uncertainty. Entire pillars of American society are shifting very, very quickly.

So, here’s the simple choice. Learn new systems, grow, and become more patient-centric while reinventing your practice, yourself and your future.

Or, do nothing, and wish things were like they used to be. Either way, recognize it is a choice that will have profound consequences on the rest of your life.

I am not saying it’s easy. If it were, all chiropractors, physical therapists and medical physicians in private practice would easily gross six and seven figure incomes. For some of us, it’s the most difficult issue in life right now.

I do however speak from experience when I tell you that the direction you take now, because it is such a pivotal time can mean dominating your given market area, building a powerful, profitable practice knowing you are fulfilling your professional destiny, and having that extra income committed to permanent interest bearing investments that can give you a lifetime of freedom.

Or, failing to act decisively, quickly, while gathering all the tools and information you must have regardless of who or what tries to dissuade you can mean closing your doors.  It’s this simple.

Do you hang around with naysayers or dwell upon how tough things are while distressing about loss of income and your investments?

It’s your choice.

Or, have you instead asked for help where you need it, moved forward with a clear vision of the future instead of regrets about the past.

While you are reviewing or reformulating your game plan, here are some of the critical areas that need special attention.

First, are you and your entire team communicating the true value, the most meaningful benefits about what you do, and simultaneously making it easy for those who want more of what you have to offer raise their hands and buy more?

Do you talk only about pain, covered physical therapy or chiropractic visits, or ‘Longer, healthier life with the energy and physical capacity to engage your passions to their fullest’?  Do you teach them how to be continuously “Looking and feeling spectacular?” And “Having more energy than people 10-15 years younger’?

Because, this is exactly what your health care does for people.

How Are You Going To Practice in 2012?

If you are not currently fully engaged along these lines, this is where I advocate you spend lots of time investigating how the practice development programs we have developed for you can best be deployed to make all this your reality too.

Always remember, these are the patients that tell everyone about their doctors. And gladly pay for everything you do. And come back year after year with their kids and grandkids.

Next, is your team crisp, efficient, friendly and understanding? Do they go out of their way to make the office a place people love to come to, and tell everyone they know? Do they also fully support you or stress you out way too much? This also, is a choice. Your choice.

As a vital referral driving and expanded patient care network, what is the quality of your healthcare professional relationships? Have you aligned yourself with like-minded MDs, DCs, PTs,  DMDs, DPMs, etc?  Do they refer easily back to you in complete confidence? Do you work to continue to help them as well as their patients?

Most importantly, do you have a clear vision, and a step-by-step game plan to make this all a reality?

A long ago, I wrote how to develop a step-by step implementation game plan. If you are having difficulty with any of these critical areas instead of going into overwhelm dedicate some quiet time, a day or two out of the office if need be, use the simple system I developed for you and just get it done.

And remember, this is where good coaching and modern tools and systems are priceless.

I look forward to hearing your success story this year!

PS This is a perfect day to begin with a new perspective and mentoring program.

For more information, go to http://perfectpracticeweb.com/home

 

Designing Treatments for Lupus Patients

 

As physicians, we’re accustomed to a certain amount of variety in treating different patients with the same illness.

After all, we’re treating individuals.

But when you take on lupus patients, you’re taking the concept of variety in symptoms and outcomes to a whole new level.

Granted, there are specific symptoms to the various types of lupus, but no two lupus patients are the same.

Lupus is an ever changing illness with periods of activity and rest that are as different as the patients they affect.

Those differences can make developing a treatment plan difficult to say the least.

And when you add peripheral neuropathy caused by lupus to the mix of symptoms[1], you have an even more complex set of issues to treat and, hopefully, stay ahead of.

If you have any hope of preventing serious neuropathy complications in your lupus patients, you have to be diligent in monitoring your patients’ symptoms and, even more importantly, your patients have to be very conscious of their symptoms and keep you advised of any changes as soon as they happen.

That means you need to educate your lupus patients on their illness and peripheral neuropathy.

Helping Patients Lupus and Peripheral Neuropathy

Because the peripheral nervous system can be affected by lupus, every system of the body that is regulated by the peripheral nervous system can be damaged[2].

That means the nerves that control involuntary body functions like heart rate, blood pressure, digestion and perspiration.  Your patients need to understand that their body many not be able to regulate their heart rate or blood pressure, they might not be able to properly digest food,  their  kidneys can be damaged and they could develop urinary problems.

And even worse, lupus can cause serious problems with inflammation.  That can lead to:

–          Inflammation of the sac around the heart

–          Diseases of the heart valves

–          Inflammation of the actual heart muscle

–          Inflammation of the tissue around the lungs or pleurisy

Now, imagine having any of these issues and having peripheral neuropathy, too…

The peripheral nervous system isn’t functioning properly and can’t send the proper signals to the brain to let them know they have a problem.

It’s easy to see why this could be serious.  By educating your patients on these possible problems and the symptoms they present early on, they can keep a watchful eye out for any symptoms and get in to you see you before they have a potentially deadly problem.

Treating Lupus Patients with Peripheral Neuropathy

Once you take a very thorough history and physical (preferably one following the NeuropathyDR® protocol for lupus patients), you’ll have a better handle on your patient’s condition.  Pay particular attention to their symptoms, when they began, the severity of the discomfort, and any and all medications they currently take (including over the counter medications, herbal supplements or vitamins).

Once you’ve complete the history and physical, the next step in the NeuropathyDR® protocol will be to order some tests. Depending upon your patient’s actual symptoms and which systems seem to be affected, these tests might include:

∙           Neurological exam

∙           Electromyography

∙           Nerve conduction velocity test

∙           Antinuclear antibody test

∙           Blood tests

∙           Urine test

∙           Skin biopsy

Once the tests are completed and you determine your patient has peripheral neuropathy associated with lupus, you can design a specific treatment program based on your patients’ specific symptoms and adjust it as they enter periods of remission or as their symptoms change.

Lupus is not curable and your patient should understand this from the outset.  Your NeuropathyDR® treatment protocol should focus on relieving pain by reducing inflammation, repairing any nerve damage with nerve stimulation, slowing joint and bone damage and improving your patients’ ability to function with their disease.

Focus on:

∙           Rest and stress management.

∙           Exercise programs designed specifically for your individual patient based on their physical limitations.

∙           Pain medication as needed.

∙           Drug therapy as needed.

∙           Safety precautions to deal with the possible loss of sensation, especially in the hands and feet, due to peripheral neuropathy.

The NeuropathyDR® protocol is ideally suited to treating lupus and the peripheral neuropathy it can cause.

Early intervention with a physician well versed in treating lupus and peripheral neuropathy, like a NeuropathyDR® clinician, is their best course of action.  While you can’t cure them, you can help them achieve a better quality of life and lessen the chance of severe and possibly fatal complications.

When you’re trained and ready to work with them, let them know you’re there.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.

 

 

 


Treating Patients with Hypoglycemia and Autonomic Neuropathy

If you’re treating patients with diabetes, chances are very good that you’ve also got patients with hypoglycemia.

Many patients with diabetes are so accustomed to their symptoms that they don’t pay attention to the subtle changes that can present with hypoglycemia.  Often, they won’t have the very dramatic symptoms like loss of consciousness or diabetic coma.

More often, they have milder symptoms like[1]

∙           Tremor

∙           Sweating

∙           Heart palpitations

None of these are that severe and they might just write them off as a response to something going on in their everyday lives.  No big deal…nothing to worry about.

But they do have a problem and a potentially serious one.

That problem is hypoglycemia.

Hypoglycemia can occur in anyone with diabetes if they’re taking medication to lower their blood glucose.  If you have type 1 diabetes and you’re insulin dependent, you stand a good chance of developing hypoglycemia.

So how do you get these patients to come to you when they first notice these symptoms so you can help them with a proactive approach to their illness?

Educate your diabetes patients on the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia and make sure they understand that the symptoms may appear to be mild but they can be physically devastating.

Understanding Why They May Not Recognize Symptoms

If your patient has type 1 diabetes, when their blood glucose levels fall, their insulin levels don’t decrease and their glucagon levels don’t increase.  They just reflect the body’s absorption of insulin.  It gives the body a false sense that all is right when all is wrong.   Because their body doesn’t register a problem, it loses its first two lines of defense against the imbalance in your system.  Their body’s normal response is impaired.

What Causes the Impairment?

Several things –

∙           The brain may have become used to hypoglycemia because it’s been dealing with it for awhile. If they’ve had frequent episodes, the system in the body responsible for transporting adrenaline to where it’s needed no longer senses a great need.  It just doesn’t respond.

∙           They may be using medications that mask their hypoglycemia symptoms and not even know it.  For example, if they take medications that are beta blockers, they’re designed to lessen the effects of adrenalin on the body.  They may not experience the tremors or heart palpitations that a normal person would during a hypoglycemic episode.  Beta blockers also block the liver from producing glucose so they’re giving the body a double whammy to deal with. Always ask your diabetic patients if they’re taking beta blockers as part of your history and physical.

∙           They may have autonomic neuropathy.  Explain to them that it’s a type of peripheral neuropathy that affects the nerves that control involuntary body functions like heart rate, blood pressure, digestion and perspiration.  The nerves are damaged and don’t function properly leading to a breakdown of the signals between the brain and the parts of the body affected by the autonomic nervous system like the heart, blood vessels, digestive system and sweat glands.  And, in their case, it may be inhibiting their liver from producing insulin.

Diagnosing and Treating Autonomic Neuropathy

Once you take a very thorough history and physical (preferably one following the NeuropathyDR® protocol for hypoglycemic and diabetic patients), you’ll have a better handle on your patient’s condition.  Pay particular attention to their symptoms, when they began, the severity of the discomfort, and any and all medications they currently take (including over the counter medications, herbal supplements or vitamins).

Watch for signs that they are not being completely up front about their diet, alcohol intake, frequency of exercise, history of drug use and smoking.  If they don’t tell the truth, you don’t have a clear picture of your physical condition.

Treatment and Prognosis

If you use the NeuropathyDR® protocol, you will find the treatment regimen ideally suited to treating diabetes, hypoglycemia and autonomic neuropathy.

Diabetes, hypoglycemia and autonomic neuropathy are chronic conditions but they can be treated and your patient can do things to help relieve their symptoms.

You can help them by offering[2]:

∙           Diet Planning and Nutritional Support

The body needs the proper the nutrition to heal.

If they have gastrointestinal issues caused by autonomic neuropathy, they need to make  sure they’re getting enough fiber and fluids to help the body function properly.  Provide them with a diet plan that ensures they get enough fiber, whole grains and drink enough      water.

If they have diabetes, work with them on a diet to control their blood sugar.

Devise a meal schedule as part of their dietary planning to keep their blood sugar levels as steady as possible.

∙          Individually Designed Exercise Programs

If your patient experiences exercise intolerance or blood pressure problems resulting  from autonomic neuropathy, develop an exercise regimen for them that will allow them to take things slowly but still work some physical activity into their daily routine.  Treating neuropathy patients requires specialized training in the design and monitoring of  exercise programs.  The NeuropathyDR® clinicians are specially trained in designing  exercise programs to meet the needs of the neuropathy patient.

Early intervention with a physician well versed in treating diabetes, hypoglycemia and autonomic neuropathy, like a NeuropathyDR® clinician, is still the best course of action. While you can’t reverse your patient’s condition if they have already developed neuropathy, you can help them achieve a better quality of life and lessen the chance of severe and possibly fatal complications.

When you’re trained and ready to work with them, let them know you’re there.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.

 

 

 

 


[1] http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/neuropathies

[2] http://diabetes.webmd.com/complementary-and-alternative-diabetes-treatments

Helping Patients with Acute Kidney Failure

Most people think that acute kidney failure would present with symptoms too obvious to ignore.

They expect to be bedridden…deathly ill…in and out of the hospital…

What they don’t realize is that acute kidney failure often doesn’t cause noticeable symptoms.  Many times it’s detected when the patient is already in the hospital for something else and evidence is found through tests.

As a clinician, especially a NeuropathyDR® clinician specializing in treating patients with neuropathy, that makes your job especially tough in reaching out to these patients and getting them in for treatment before it’s too late and permanent damage is done.

Most of the time, you won’t see these patients until they have[1]

∙           Swelling, especially in the legs and feet

∙           Cramps, muscle twitching or muscle weakness

∙           Little or no urine output

∙           Thirst and a dry mouth

∙           Dizziness

∙           Rapid heart rate

∙           Nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite

∙           Confusion

∙           Anxiety or restlessness

∙           Pain on one side of the back just below the rib cage but above the waist

∙           Fatigue

These are all symptoms of acute kidney failure.  And the root cause of many of these symptoms is a serious complication of kidney failure – uremic neuropathy.  Uremic neuropathy or neuropathy associated with kidney failure is a very common complication of kidney failure.

The sad thing is that by the time they’re exhibiting several of these symptoms, their uremic neuropathy may have already done serious damage to their body.  If you have patients with conditions like lupus, diabetes or hepatic (liver) failure, they’re especially prone to acute kidney failure and uremic neuropathy.  Your best bet to treat them effectively and keep them off dialysis and off the transplant list is to educate them.  The more they know about the possibility of developing uremic neuropathy from acute kidney failure, the more likely they’ll be to show up in your office for help before they have irreversible problems.

First, explain uremic neuropathy…

What Is Uremic Neuropathy[2]?

Uremic neuropathy is a type of neuropathy caused by an increase in uremic toxins in the blood (the toxins urine usually removed from the body when the kidneys function properly.) The severity of their uremic neuropathy is directly linked to the severity of their kidney failure.  If their kidney failure is acute, their uremic neuropathy is pretty serious.

How Can Kidney Failure Lead to Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is one of the worst results of chronic kidney disease.  Acute kidney failure damages the kidneys.  When the kidneys are damaged fluids, waste products and toxins build up in the body.   Because many organs and bodily systems (particularly the nervous system) are directly affected by this build up of toxins, acute kidney failure leads to overall poor health and inflammation and nerve damage.

Once the nerves are damaged, they cease to function properly.  One complication leads to another and, in 20% to 50% of patients with acute kidney failure, they’ll develop uremic neuropathy.

Treatment and Prognosis

Your patient’s best course of action is to catch their kidney issues before they become acute and they develop uremic neuropathy.  Unfortunately, once the kidneys are that severely damaged, dialysis and possible kidney transplant are virtually inevitable.

That’s why you need to impress upon your patients how vitally important it is that they not ignore symptoms and that they seek treatment immediately once they notice a problem.  Acute kidney failure and uremic neuropathy are not conditions that just get better on their own.

As a NeuropathyDR® clinician you have a wonderful protocol to assist you in working with your patients and their whole medical team to treat and manage your underlying condition before they become acute.

Some programs you can offer your patients are:

∙           Diet Planning and Nutritional Support

They need to give their bodies the nutrition they need to heal.

A low protein diet is best for patients with kidney disease.

If your patient has diabetes, they need to follow a diet specifically designed for diabetics and to control their blood sugar.

∙          Individually Designed Exercise Programs

If your patient is experiencing dizziness, rapid heart rate, extreme thirst or issues with impaired sensation in their feet and legs, they have to be very careful with their exercise program.  You can design an exercise program specifically for them that will allow them to exercise but not push them beyond what their body is capable of.  And, even more importantly, continually monitor their progress and adjust the program as needed.

These changes in conjunction with medications and possibly more involved medical intervention will make it easier to live with acute kidney failure and uremic neuropathy. Early intervention with a NeuropathyDR® clinician is still the best policy if they have any of the underlying conditions that can cause uremic neuropathy.  If they already have symptoms, start treatment immediately.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.

 

 

 

 


[1] http://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-health/?gclid=CIy7yPXaiKoCFaZd5QodhTvoyA

[2] www.kidney.org/professionals/kdoqi/guidelines_ckd/p6_comp_g11.htm

 

Caring for Patients With Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Peripheral Neuropathy

The peripheral neuropathy patient population is growing.

That’s understandable when you look at the increase in

•      Diabetes

•      Cancer

•      Autoimmune diseases like lupus, Guillain-Barre’ Syndrome

But there is another fast growing peripheral neuropathy patient population that often goes unnoticed.

Patients with sexually transmitted diseases or STD’s[1] such as:

•     HIV/AIDS

•     Genital Herpes (or any one of the large number of herpes-simplex viruses)

•     Gonorrhea

•     Syphilis

•     Chlamydia

•     Hepatitis B and D

•     HPV (Human papillomavirus infection)

Or some combination of these diseases.

These patients can be some of your most challenging.  Many are reluctant to discuss or even acknowledge that they have an STD.  By the time they’ve developed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy and seek treatment from a specialist in treating neuropathy, they could be facing serious nerve damage.

You could be playing beat the clock to head off permanent damage.  Your first order of business is to educate them on peripheral neuropathy, how they developed it and what they need to do to help themselves.

Explaining How Their STD Caused Peripheral Neuropathy

Many sexually transmitted diseases are caused by viruses or bacteria[2].  Viruses and bacteria can attack nerve tissue and severely damage sensory nerves. If those nerves are damaged, your patient is going to feel the pain, quickly.

The virus that causes HIV, in particular, can cause extensive damage to the peripheral nerves.  Often, the progression of the disease can actually be tracked according to the specific type of neuropathy the patient develops.  Painful polyneuropathy affecting the feet and hands can be one of first clinical signs of HIV infection.

Any of these viruses or bacteria can cause nerve damage and the resulting peripheral neuropathy.  Many patients understand the more common symptoms of their illness but they don’t understand why they would have nerve damage.  Once they understand exactly why they’re having

•     Muscle weakness

•     Muscle cramps

•     Inability to feel sensation

•     Numbness or tingling

•     Burning

•     Loss of reflexes

•     Blood pressure problems

•     Sweating too much or too little

•     Heart rate issues and inability to feel chest pain

•     Bladder control issues

•     Diarrhea or constipation

•     Difficulty swallowing because your esophagus doesn’t function properly

•     Bloating

•     Erectile dysfunction

•     Heart burn

•     Inability to feel sensation in your hands and feet

They will better understand why you’re recommending the treatment your recommending.  Chances are that when they were diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease, they understood how it would affect their sex life and the more intimate aspects of their lives.  They had no idea that their STD could cause serious nerve damage as well.  Understanding exactly how these illnesses can cause peripheral neuropathy and serious nerve damage will make for a much more compliant patient.

The Best Course of Treatment

If your patient presents with any of these diseases and they’ve developed peripheral neuropathy, start treatment immediately.  The earlier you start treatment, the less likely they will be to develop permanent nerve damage.  Your NeuropathyDR® protocol offers one of the best chances these patients have for minimizing or even avoiding permanent nerve damage from peripheral neuropathy.

In addition to the NeuropathyDR® protocol and specific drug therapies designed for the particular condition, you also need to work with your patient on lifestyle issues.  Specifically,

•     Getting plenty of rest

•     Pacing themselves and limiting their activities

•     Exercising  regularly – walking, swimming and yoga are great exercises for neuropathy patients

•     Take care of their skin and limiting exposure to the sun

•     Quitting smoking

•     Eating a healthy, well balanced diet

•     Keeping high blood pressure under control

•     Always practicing safe sex to protect their partners and themselves

As a NeuropathyDR® clinician you can offer these patients the best chance possible for avoiding permanent nerve damage from their sexually transmitted disease.

Once you’re trained in the NeuropathyDR® treatment protocol and ready serve this challenging and fast growing patient population, let us help you reach them.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.

 

 

 

Good Foot Care – Keeping Your Diabetic Neuropathy Patients Healthy

Help Diabetics with Better Care

 

Diabetes is one of the fastest growing illnesses in America.

That means that if you don’t currently have patients with diabetes (unlikely, but possible), you will soon.

And that means you’re going to be treating patients with diabetic neuropathy, particularly in their feet.  According to the American Diabetes Association, one in five diabetes patients end up in the hospital with foot problems.  All too often those foot problems lead to amputation or raging systemic infections.

The best way to prevent these problems in your diabetic neuropathy patients is by educating them on how important it is to take care of their feet and to intervene as early as possible when they do develop problems.  Determine the extent of your diabetic neuropathy patient’s problems and then educate them on proper foot and diabetes care.

Step One  – The Thorough Foot Examination[1]

If you have patients with diabetic neuropathy, even if they don’t present with foot issues, you need to be proactive as their physician and ensure that you see them at least once a year for a complete foot examination.

When you’re examining their feet, make sure you:

•         Examine each foot between the toes and from toe to heel.  Make extensive notes in the chart of any problems by drawing or labeling the finding on the foot diagram.   If your patient has skin that is thin, fragile, shiny and hairless, they could have problems with their circulation and that means possible nerve damage.

•         Ask the patient if they’ve noticed any change in how their feet sweat.  If their feet don’t sweat as they normally would they can develop dry, cracked skin and those cracks can become infected.

•         If your patient is wearing nail polish, take it off.  Check for ingrown toenails, deformed nails or any type of nail fungus.

•         Make notes on the diagram and in the chart of any areas on the feet that are noticeably dry, red or warm to the touch.

Step Two  – Patient Education

In order to prevent serious problems, your diabetic neuropathy patients need to know how to care for their feet and what to watch for so they can come in to see you before they reach a point  of no return.

They need to:

•         Check their feet every day.  Look at their bare feet to make sure they don’t have any sores, blisters, or swelling.  If they can’t see the bottoms of their feet, they should use a mirror or ask someone else to check them.

•         Wash their feet every day and dry them completely to eliminate the possibility of fungus growth.

•         Use a good lotion on their feet to keep skin smooth and prevent dry, cracked skin.  Don’t use lotion between the toes – it will keep the skin there too moist and that breeds bacteria.

•         Trim their toenails but not too short.  Cut them straight across and file the edges with a nail file to prevent ingrown toenails.

•         Always wear shoes and socks – even inside the house.  If they have neuropathy, it’s just too easy to step on something and injure their feet without even feeling it.

•         Wear comfortable shoes, preferable shoes designed for people with diabetic neuropathy in their feet.  Check their shoes before they put them on and make sure the lining is intact and smooth and that nothing is in their shoes.  Talk to them about Medicare assistance with purchasing special shoes.

•         Never put their feet in hot water.  Always check the temperature of their bath water with the elbow before stepping into it.

•         Never use hot water bottles or heating pads on their feet.  Neuropathy makes it harder to sense extreme temperatures and they can burn their feet without even knowing it.

•         When sitting down, they should prop their feet up to keep the blood circulating.  Move the toes and ankles to keep the blood pumping.

•         Never cross their legs when sitting.

Don’t just tell them what they need to do and take it for granted that they understand what you’re telling them.  Ask your patient to demonstrate the steps to proper foot care so you know they know what you’re saying and that they are physically capable of doing what you’re telling them to do.

Offer your diabetic neuropathy patients an ongoing monitoring and follow up program.  Keep in touch and watch for any of the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy in the feet.   Diabetic neuropathy impairs the ability to feel pain in the extremities and they may not notice the problem until it’s too late for successful treatment.  It never hurts to have a fresh pair of eyes (yours) keeping watch over them.

When you’re trained and ready to treat them, let us help you reach them.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.

 

Treating Hand/Foot Peripheral Neuropathy as a Secondary Symptom

 

Let’s say you have a patient with

•         Diabetes

•         Cancer (and you’re undergoing chemotherapy)

•         Shingles

•         HIV/AIDS

And they’re presenting with

•     Swelling in the feet, legs or hands

•     Muscle cramps in the legs

•     Changes in the skin and nails

•     Numbness in the feet and hands

•     Inability of feel heat or cold

•     Sleepless nights due to pain

•     Muscle weakness

•     Painful burning and itching in the hands or feet

•     Feeling like they’re wearing gloves or socks when they’re not

Chances are very good that you have a patient with a serious secondary complication from their illness.

They could have peripheral neuropathy in their feet and/or hands.

Diagnosing Peripheral Neuropathy in the Hands and Feet[1]

This is a tough diagnosis to make.  The symptoms can vary so much between patients.  And when you’re dealing with patients with such serious illnesses at the root of their problems, it can be hard to pinpoint exactly what the problem is.

Your best bet is to start with a really thorough history and physical followed by an extensive neurological examination.  The good news is that if your patient is presenting with a known illness, you don’t have to play detective to find out what their underlying medical condition is.  You just have to figure out if the symptoms they’re seeing you for are caused by nerve damage.

Treatment Options for Peripheral Neuropathy in the Hands and Feet[2]

The first thing you need to do is work with your patient’s other physicians to ensure that the underlying medical condition is under control.  Once you understand the treatment regimen they’re undertaking, you can begin to address possible nerve damage and healing the nerves.

Make sure your patient is

•     Getting plenty of rest

•     Pacing themselves

•     Exercising regularly – walking and swimming are good exercises for neuropathy patients

•     Taking care of their feet and hands

•     Not smoking

•     Eating a healthy, well balanced diet

Make sure your patient understands how vitally important it is to pay attention to any wounds on their feet and hands and that they should contact you as their NeuropathyDR® specialist immediately if they notice any blisters, sores, torn skin, or inflammation.   The combination of their underlying medical condition can lead to very serious infections that are slow or impossible to heal.   This can lead to dire complications that can be avoided if they receive the proper medical treatment early.

Show your patients how to do a visual inspection of their feet and hands for any problems.  They need to know that they cannot rely on soreness or pain to know if something is wrong.  Their peripheral neuropathy will impair their ability to feel pain in their feet and hands and they may not notice the problem until it’s too late for successful treatment.

Let us help you reach these patients and treat them.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.

 

 


[1] www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/peripheralneuropathy/detail_peripheralneuropathy.htm

[2] http://www.webmd.com/brain/tingling-in-hands-and-feet

Hope for Your Patients With Infectious Diseases

 

What can you do for your patients with infectious diseases?

They’re miserable and their misery is understandable.

Look at what they’re dealing with[1]:

•     Extreme fatigue

•     Headaches

•     Painful, swollen joints

•     Anemia

•     Fever and chills

•     Swelling in your feet, legs or hands

•     Pleurisy

•     Rashes

•     Hair loss

If they have lupus, Lyme Disease[2], Varicella Zoster (aka Shingles), HIV/AIDS, Legionnaire’s Disease or any other infectious disease caused by a virus or bacteria, these symptoms can be just the beginning of their problems.

If they’ve delayed treatment, the next problem they could be faced with is

peripheral neuropathy and everything that comes with it.  Other than getting busy treating them to avoid peripheral neuropathy and nerve damage, one of the first things you need to do is educate your patient.

Explaining How Their Illness Can Cause Peripheral Neuropathy

Many infectious diseases are caused by viruses or bacteria.  Viruses and bacteria can attack nerve tissue and severely damage sensory nerves. If those nerves are damaged, your patient is going to feel the pain, quickly.

The virus that causes HIV, in particular, can cause extensive damage to the peripheral nerves.  Often, the progression of the disease can actually be tracked according to the specific type of neuropathy the patient develops.  Painful polyneuropathy affecting the feet and hands can be one of first clinical signs of HIV infection.

Any of these viral or bacterial disorders can cause indirect nerve damage and bring on conditions that we refer to as autoimmune disorders.  Autoimmune disorders cause the body’s immune system to go on the offensive and attack its own tissues.  These assaults by the body on the body damage the nerve’s protective covering.  Think of it as “internal friendly fire” – misdirected but potentially serious.

Many patients understand the more common symptoms of their illness but they don’t understand why they would have nerve damage.  Once they understand exactly why they’re having

•     Muscle weakness

•     Muscle cramps

•     Inability to feel sensation

•     Numbness or tingling

•     Burning

•     Loss of reflexes

•     Blood pressure problems

•     Sweating too much or too little

•     Heart rate issues and inability to feel chest pain

•     Bladder control issues

•     Diarrhea or constipation

•     Difficulty swallowing because your esophagus doesn’t function properly

•     Bloating

•     Heart burn

•     Inability to feel sensation in your hands and feet

They will better understand why you’re recommending the treatment your recommending.  Hearing that they have a virus or bacterial infection can be very misleading – they think all they need is medication and they’ll be fine.  Understanding exactly how these illnesses can cause peripheral neuropathy and nerve damage will make for a much more compliant patient.

The Best Course of Treatment

If your patient presents with any of these diseases, start treatment immediately.  The earlier you start treatment, the less likely they will be to develop peripheral neuropathy and nerve damage.  Your NeuropathyDR® protocol offers one of the best chances these patients have for minimizing or even avoiding nerve damage from peripheral neuropathy.

In addition to the NeuropathyDR® protocol and specific drug therapies designed for the particular condition, you also need to work with your patient on lifestyle issues.  Specifically,

•     Getting plenty of rest

•     Pacing themselves and limiting their activities

•     Exercising  regularly – walking, swimming and yoga are great exercises for neuropathy patients

•     Take care of their skin and limiting exposure to the sun

•     Quitting smoking

•     Eating a healthy, well balanced diet

•     Keeping high blood pressure under control

A Few Words To The Wise

Each of these conditions is very different and caused by different organisms.  For that reason, patients with different infectious diseases must be treated differently.  They’re nerve damage has resulted from different causes.

There are a few things to consider when treating these patients:

•     For female patients, it’s particularly important to be cautious about birth control.  Any of these infectious diseases can cause serious problems during pregnancy.

•     Make sure they receive vaccinations for flu and pneumonia to help prevent additional or secondary infections that could compromise their progress.

•     If they’ve been treated with corticosteroids for inflammation, make sure they are closely monitored for osteoporosis.

•     If your patient has lupus, make sure they receive regular eye exams.  Lupus can have an adverse effect on vision.

•     Lyme disease is on the rise so educate your patient population on the warning signs of infection – a tick bite followed by a bulls-eye shaped rash close to the bite site.

As a NeuropathyDR® clinician you can offer these patients the best chance possible for avoiding permanent nerve damage from their infectious disease.

Once you’re trained in the NeuropathyDR® treatment protocol and ready serve this challenging patient population, let us help you reach them.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.

 

 

Doing Everything You Can For Your Cancer Patients

Cancer brings many challenges into the lives of your patients…

Treatment options…

Disruption of normal activities…

Fear, anxiety and depression…

When treating your cancer and post chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients, it’s easy to become focused on just the disease itself and the symptoms.  But don’t overlook their emotional and psychological issues.  These can be as debilitating as the disease itself and seriously affect treatment outcomes if not addressed.

Depression caused by chronic pain and frustration can derail an otherwise successful course of treatment.

When treating your cancer patients, strive to become a one stop shop for addressing not only their post chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy and other physical side effects from treatment, but also a great resource for supportive services and information that can provide a tremendous benefit to your cancer patients.

Help them address some of the serious obstacles to successful treatment that most health care professionals don’t think about.

Patient Information Resources[1]

Make your office the one place your cancer patients know they can go to for current patient information and education about cancer treatment options, specific types of cancer, long and short term side effects of their chosen course of treatment.  When preparing your patient information materials, include education on cancer diagnosis, treatment, clinical trials, treatment side effects from chemotherapy or radiation and questions they should ask their doctors.  Provide them with a list of local resources that are available to assist them with the challenges they face as a cancer patient.

Support for Lifestyle Changes

A cancer diagnosis can mean serious lifestyle changes for your cancer patients.  Smokers will probably have to quit smoking; athletes will have to curtail some of their physical activity; patients who live alone may have to stay with family members while undergoing treatment.  All of these changes can lead to serious emotional issues.  Provide counseling to your cancer and post chemotherapy neuropathy patients on dealing with these lifestyle changes proactively.  Provide tips on what they should expect and the best ways to handle these short term challenges.

Don’t Be Afraid to Talk About Money

For cancer patients with no insurance or even less than adequate insurance, a cancer diagnosis can be especially devastating.  They may forego necessary prescriptions or even skip appointments. When trying to pay for their cancer treatment, they may find it difficult to even pay for the most basic necessities of life.  Become familiar with programs in your area that can assist your cancer patients with paying for medications, providing home health assistance, or even services that can help them with transportation to and from their health care providers.

Any assistance will help.  Fighting cancer is hard enough without the added worry of financial issues.  Just knowing that there are resources available to help might ward off the serious depression that can make recovery that much more difficult.

Keeping Track of Medical Information[2]

When a patient is undergoing chemotherapy, radiation or other treatment for cancer, they have mountains of information to keep track of.  They need to monitor when to take their medication, how to take it, keep up with medical appointments, monitor their symptoms, and make note of any and all side effects their experience.  They need to keep a written record of everything.  Provide them with a record book or specific forms to make it easier for them to write everything down and keep it in one place.  It will not only make it easier for your cancer patient to manage their medical information, it will make it much easier for you just having all their notes together in one place.

By providing all these additional support services to your cancer and post chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients, your practice will become their go to health care provider for information and support.  Two things that they desperately need and will greatly appreciate.

When you are ready to provide these services, let them know you’re there to help them.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.


[1] http://www.cancer.net/patient/Publications+and+Resources

[2] http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Disease/PsychosocialCancer/

The Whole Package – Nutrition Planning for Your Post-Chemotherapy Patients

Treating patients in the recovery stage of cancer, the post-chemotherapy patient, can be incredibly rewarding.

They’ve already been through the fire.

Now they’re looking for your help in dealing with issues of recovery – coming to terms with the side effects from

∙           Chemotherapy

∙           Radiation

∙           Experimental treatments including possible hormone therapy

Chances are your post-chemotherapy patients are suffering from

∙           Loss of appetite

∙           Nausea and other digestive issues

∙           Post chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy

∙           Dry mouth

Or some combination of these post-chemotherapy symptoms.

One of the most important pieces of the post-chemotherapy recovery puzzle is nutritional support.

If you’re not already offering diet and nutrition counseling to your post-chemotherapy patients, it’s time to start. More and more research is confirming that proper nutrition is key in successful recovery from chemotherapy and other cancer treatments, as well as recovering from the cancer itself.

The body requires essential materials, vitamins and nutrients, to heal.  Without them, no medical treatment has any hope of succeeding.

Helping your post-chemotherapy patients with planning their diet and making food appealing again will work wonders for the success rate of your treatment in this patient population.

Here are some things to think about when designing a cancer recovery nutrition program:

Basic Cancer Nutrition Tips[1]

The post-chemotherapy patient’s body (or even the patient preparing to start chemotherapy) needs increased support for the immune system.  The best option for doing that is a diet rich in whole foods that are easy on the digestive system.  Make sure your patients’ cancer recovery diet includes foods that are high in anti-oxidants and protein.  Your post-chemotherapy patient diet plan should include foods rich in vitamins, especially vitamins C, D and E and nutrients like soy isoflavones, amino acids, folic acid, l-glutamine, calcium and carotenoids.  Encourage your patients to drink as much water as possible and don’t worry about keeping their calorie count low.  This is the time to take in all the calories they need, as long as the calories come from beneficial foods.

Chemotherapy and radiation may affect your post-chemotherapy patients’ ability to digest foods so encourage them to invest in a good food processor and/or juicer.  Both of these tools will allow them to prepare foods that are easy to ingest and digest while still getting the nutrition they need.

Foods To Rebuild The Post-Chemotherapy Patient’s Body

It’s easy to say “eat foods that are high in vitamins” but your post-chemotherapy patients may not know exactly which foods they need.  Here are some suggestions for foods to aid in cancer recovery and fighting chemotherapy symptoms[2]:

Vitamin C

∙           Red cabbage

∙           Kiwi fruit

∙           Oranges

∙           Red and Green Bell Peppers

∙           Potatoes

Vitamin D

∙           Salmon and tuna

Vitamin E

∙           Nuts, including almonds and peanuts

∙           Avocados

∙           Broccoli

Carotenoids

∙           Apricots

∙           Carrots

∙           Greens, especially collard greens and spinach

∙           Sweet potatoes

Soy Isoflavones

∙           Soybeans

∙           Tofu

∙           Soy milk – this could also be helpful if you need to go lactose-free

Folic Acid

∙           Asparagus

∙           Dried beans

∙           Beets

∙           Brussels sprouts

∙           Garbanzo beans

∙           Lentils

∙           Turkey

These are just a few examples.  If you’re unsure about other nutrition recommendations, talk to us.  We can help assist you in devising diet plans that will help rebuild their immune systems.

Use Herbs and Spices to Give Your Food More Flavor

Herbs and spices are a natural way to flavor food without adding man-made chemicals.  And many herbs have natural medicinal properties of their own.  Suggest these herbs and spices to help your post-chemotherapy patients make their food taste better.  If it tastes better, they’ll eat more:

∙           Cinnamon

∙           Basil

∙           Coriander

∙           Cumin

∙           Ginger (natural anti-inflammatory properties, too)

∙           Garlic

∙           Mint (great for fighting nausea as well)

∙           Fennel

∙           Turmeric

We hope this gives you some insight into diet planning and nutrition counseling for your post chemotherapy patients. Offering these services to your cancer patient population can be the missing piece in the puzzle of successfully treating the patients in this growing specialty and help you build a successful medical practice as well.  The combination of your medical expertise and proper nutrition support and counseling is a win/win for doctor and patient.

When you are ready, let them know you’re there to help them.

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.


[1] www.cancer.org/Treatment/SurvivorshipDuringandAfterTreatment

[2] www.mayoclinic.com/health/cancer-survivor

The Post-Chemotherapy Cancer Patient – A Growing Chiropractic Patient Population

A cancer diagnosis is terrifying.

The questions, the fear and the concept of facing their own mortality are enough to paralyze even the strongest individual.

In the not so distant past, the standard was surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation or some combination of the three and that was it.

Then the patient played the waiting game to see what, if anything, worked.

What people didn’t realize was that the end of a course of chemotherapy was not the end of the healing process.  They would be dealing with the lasting effects of chemotherapy long after their hair returned and the nausea ended.

And one of those lasting effects is post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy.

Fortunately for the chiropractic community, cancer patients are quickly learning that chiropractic, nutrition and often the correct forms of nerve stimulation when combined in the hands of a skilled chiropractor can help alleviate the symptoms of their post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy.

The post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patient is becoming an enlightened consumer of complementary therapies that go beyond traditional medications and standard medical treatments.

A new-enlightened approach to treating their peripheral neuropathy symptoms gives the chiropractic community an ever-expanding patient population to serve.  Treating these patients who have already walked through an experience most people live in fear of can be incredibly rewarding.

To get them in your office though, you need to show them exactly how your chiropractic and specialty care can improve their quality of life.  It’s not just about marketing the traditional chiropractic care that people associate with whiplash or sports injuries.  It’s about educating the potential post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patient on a three-pronged approach to their medical issues:

First, Chiropractic- It’s Not Just About Adjustments

Chances are that your potential post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients have never been treated by a chiropractor.  They may think they know what a chiropractor does but they may not understand everything that chiropractic can do for managing their condition.

Traditionally, chiropractors have been associated with treatment of injuries and illnesses affecting the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints.  In educating the post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patient, recognize that they can be dealing with gait problems, muscular weakness or even issues caused by radiation.  The stress of dealing with any of these conditions cannot always be addressed by standard chiropractic techniques. 1

Chiropractic by itself cannot prevent or cure cancer, but it can help the post-chemotherapy neuropathy patient deal with the symptoms and pain associated both with their cancer and their course of treatment.  Often, by carefully mobilizing the spine and related tissues, we stimulate a healthier nervous system and that’s a basic building block for regaining their pre-cancer health and alleviating their nerve pain.

Nutrition

Chemotherapy and other cancer medications can wreck a patient’s digestive system.  In the process of killing cancer cells, it can also damage healthy cells and that’s what brings on the side effects of chemotherapy.  This can affect not only affect their ability to eat but also prevent the body from getting the nutrients it needs.

Talk to your post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients about their nutrition issues.  They can be dealing with any number of symptoms ranging from nausea and loss of appetite to dry mouth and changes in their sense of taste and smell.  Offering nutrition information and dietary planning services is another way to serve this patient population.  Good nutrition will boost the immune system and let it do its job in fighting off illnesses brought on by chemotherapy.

Potential post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients may not realize that this is an area of their recovery you may help with. So, if you are trained in this specialty, make sure you include nutrition information in your patient education materials.  Post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients need to make sure they’re getting nutrients to prevent or reverse nutritional deficiencies, lessen the side effects of treatment and improve their quality of life.  Without appropriate, simultaneous nutrition, other treatment protocols have no chance of success.

Appropriate Nerve Stimulation

Once a course of treatment has been designed and a nutrition plan established, the final piece in the overall treatment of the post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patient treatment plan is nerve stimulation.

There are some nerve stimulation techniques to help peripheral neuropathy patients.
But some are potentially harmful. Misapplication is dangerous. Learn the correct ways, and then educate your potential post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients on the options available to them.

Some patients may have adopted an attitude of “I went through chemotherapy and my cancer is gone.  I shouldn’t complain about nerve pain.  I should just be thankful to be alive”.

What they need to know is that they don’t always have to just live with sleeplessness, pain, and balance and walking issues secondary to their treatment. Your chiropractic practice, when specially trained and equipped can offer them hope for a more normal life without debilitating pain.  Yes, they survived cancer but they can beat their post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy, too. 2

Precise combinations of chiropractic, nutrition and often nerve stimulation are showing great promise in helping post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients return to a pain free life, without the debilitating effects of neuropathy.

Serving this courageous patient population can be incredibly rewarding. But it is a subspecialty that takes some study and time to learn.

When you are ready, let them know you’re there to help them.

1.http://www.webmd.com/cancer/news/20040224/cancer-patients-try-alternative-medicine

2.http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/treating-nerve-pain-caused-cancer-hiv

For more tips on growing a successful chiropractic, physical therapy or pain management practice, log on to http://perfectpractice web.com to download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.

It Has To Be You

How many times have you seen an ad in a magazine…

Or A TV commercial…

Or any other marketing message and thought “Hmmm…that just doesn’t sound right to me”?

The minute your “Bogus Meter” goes on high alert, the company vying for your dollars has zero chance of ever getting you to buy their product.

The same goes for the patients and, even more so, the prospective patients in your chiropractic or physical therapy practice.

Chiropractic or physical therapy patients may already have a hypersensitive Bogus Meter because they’ve tried so many other treatments for their chronic pain and had no success.  They’re still suffering.

With prospective patients, it doesn’t matter how much you spend on advertising or how polished your marketing is, if it doesn’t ring true, they won’t come to you for help.

In short, it has to be you and it has to be true.

Your marketing message has to be authentic and it has to be honest if you want to build a successful chiropractic or physical therapy practice.

As with any other business, two of the ground rules of successful marketing are to make sure your  message is 1) simple and 2) honest.

Here are a couple of tips to help you reach the patients you want for your chiropractic or physical therapy practice:

1.         Keep It Simple, Sir

This is the K.I.S.S. marketing concept and it has worked for decades because:

·           Simple messages are easier to remember and recall

·           Simple messages are easier to repeat so your patients are more likely to pass them

on to other potential patients

·           Simple messages are easier to understand and they stick with your prospective  patients

If your prospective patients can remember, repeat and understand your message, it’s going to be more effective.  Don’t confuse your patients with a long, complicated idea.

Just keep it simple and speak their language.

When you’re writing your marketing message to your patients, never put more than one  idea in a paragraph.  One idea, supported by facts, per paragraph.  Period.  It doesn’t get  much simpler than that.

2.        The Truth and Nothing But the Truth

It’s so easy for your patients to go online and fact check everything you tell them.  If  you’re not being totally honest about treatments, prospective outcomes, etc., they’ll find it out and in pretty short order.

The minute your chiropractic or physical therapy patients feel you’ve been less than honest with them, you’re done.  You won’t see them in your office again.  And when they  go, they’ll take all their future referrals and testimonials for your chiropractic or  physical therapy practice with them.

Just remember that tag line – The Truth and Nothing But the Truth.  Don’t promise what you can’t deliver.

And another word to the wise – don’t use someone else’s voice in your marketing materials. It’s YOUR chiropractic practice or YOUR physical therapy practice.  The minute your prospective patient reads your marketing materials, they form an impression in their mind of who you are.  Make sure it’s an authentic picture.

Don’t repurpose someone else’s advertising materials.  You may like their concept and you may want to use it to build your own successful chiropractic or physical therapy practice, but make sure you’re using your own voice.  Modify what worked for someone else to accurately represent you.

Keep it simple and keep it true and you’ll be well on your way to living and practicing by design…

And even more importantly, by YOUR design.

For more tips on building your perfect chiropractic or physical therapy practice, download a FREE E-Book Copy of my 5 star Amazon  “Living and Practicing by Design” at http://perfectpracticeweb.com.