Private Practice Marketing Strategy

Private Practice Owner? Know These 3 Keys to Successful Team Management

No private practice owner can succeed without an effective team. Implement these 3 keys to team management and see your private practice thrive.

As a private practice owner, it’s your vision and knowledge that guides your business to success. Without you, your team is just a group of people with skills but without a shared vision.

But without your team, would you be able to be a private practice owner at all? Probably not.

If your private practice is thriving, most likely it’s because you’ve built an excellent team with good rapport and a solid understanding of how to work together to meet shared goals.

On the other hand, if your business is struggling, your team is a good place to look for answers.

Here are three essential components of team management that will cause a significant positive shift in your experience as a private practice owner:

1. Set clear expectations—and live up to them yourself.

You’ll need to implement a clear, simple set of expectations for team behaviors and protocols, and find ways to reinforce these messages on a weekly basis. Of course, you’ll also need to model these policies by following them to the letter yourself!

2. Offer your team reminders of your shared vision and measurable goals.

One way to keep your team in touch with vision and goals as a private practice owner is to hold daily or weekly team conferences. Your team will be able to touch base as a group, you’ll have frequent opportunities to provide feedback on measurable goals, and your team will be reassured and energized by regular communications. You’ll also be able to identify problems earlier and address them privately if needed.

3. Provide personal incentives as well as feedback.

Part of the role of a private practice owner is to know and effectively guide each team member. Understand what makes each of your staff “tick” and how to motivate them personally. Then you can provide frequent personal feedback tailored to that staff member in addition to using what you’ve learned to implement incentives for the group as a whole.

With these three components solidly in place, you’ll find that your staff will begin to come to work without that clock-watching “just a job” attitude. And, due to the likelihood of increased efficiency and customer service that will organically happen, you’ll also see the difference in your profits as a private practice owner.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

Loyal Patients in Private Practice

Your Physical Therapy Business is Not a Desk Job

You’re the CEO of your physical therapy business, the leader and visionary for your team. But the last place you should be is behind a desk.

As the practice owner and chief decision-maker for your physical therapy business, you are effectively the CEO of your company. But if your mental picture of a CEO features someone sitting behind a large mahogany desk, you’d better think again.

If you want your physical therapy business to grow and thrive, you should be spending very little time at a desk. It’s time to step away from your desk and step into an active, hands-on role as a team leader.

As CEO, you’ll need to become deeply involved in every aspect of your business.

Of course, there’s a fine line between deep awareness and micromanaging. As you move around the office, don’t just step in between your staff and the work they’re doing—which might be viewed as intrusive and controlling. After all, you hired your team carefully with a view to being able to trust them to do their jobs well.

Instead, think of it from the perspective of simply being visible and present throughout the day. Make it a point to briefly shadow each team member at his or her job every few days, so that your team gets accustomed to having you right there. Keep in mind that the objective isn’t to monitor for mistakes. The idea is that you’ll be able to put yourself in your staff’s shoes and understand the key aspects of every role.

The goal is to become familiar with the workings of every aspect of your physical therapy business. Allow your team to become your teachers. If you don’t know or understand how something works, ask your staff to demonstrate or explain. You can rely on your staff, who do this job day in and day out, to provide the most effective input on what improvements are needed, rather than handing down directives about how to improve.

In short, you should spend very little time at your desk. Use this space for research and learning during quiet hours, before staff arrive or after they leave. During the workday, when staff and patients are in the office, be in the office. Strive to be an active part of the office environment on a daily and weekly basis, and you’ll find that your physical therapy business begins to really come alive.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

Chiropractic Business Building Depends on Marketing (Not Jargon)

In chiropractic business building, effective marketing requires you to speak your patient’s language—the language of pain.

You’ve been to seminars and read articles on the essential components of chiropractic business building. They all emphasize that effective marketing is the way to get new patients in the door.

But here’s something those articles and seminars may have neglected to tell you… and I can almost guarantee that you didn’t learn this key concept about chiropractic business building in school.

Effective marketing means speaking your patient’s language. Patients don’t speak chiropractic. They speak the language of PAIN.

Take a look at this quick list of chiropractic jargon—concepts that are very familiar to you as a chiropractor:

  • Diversified technique
  • Gonstead technique
  • Innate intelligence
  • Subluxation
  • Activation technique

Think of how hard you have to work to educate your existing patients on what these terms mean and why they’re important.

Prospective patients won’t take the time and effort to understand what you’re talking about. To grab and keep their attention, you’ve got to talk about the things that are important to them. Here are examples of the language that prospective patients use:

  • I have chronic pain in my [body area].
  • My activities are limited.
  • I can’t walk / exercise / use my legs the way that I need to.
  • I can’t do my job anymore.
  • I’m having trouble sleeping because of this pain.

See the difference?

When you make the switch from jargon marketing—a focus on your specialized knowledge and training—to pain marketing, prospective patients will flock to your door. Chances are, you’ll be the only chiropractic practice in your area who is speaking directly TO the patient instead of trying to simply talk AT them. With pain marketing, you’re not saying, “I’m the best.” Instead, you’re saying, “You’re in pain, and I can help.”

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

For Private Practice Success, Check Your Mindset

The Missing Link in Private Practice Success: Check Your Mindset

You May Think That External Factors Will Make or Break Your Private Practice Success. In Reality, Your Mindset Drives Your Practice.

Every day you navigate the ins and outs of your private practice and wear a number of different hats. As a private practice owner, you make the key decisions that drive the future of your business. And as a clinician, of course, you’re also working in your practice from day to day as you treat patients.

But how do you treat them? As commodities, or as unique individuals?

How do you treat your business? As a job that you attend every day to bring in a paycheck, or as a delicate ecosystem that requires your own hand to survive and thrive?

Your mindset determines everything—from your earning power to your life-work balance and overall satisfaction.

In essence, private practice success is so dependent on mindset because it has two components. Your mindset drives your vision for private practice success, the long-term picture of your practice’s health. Your mindset also functions as your biggest and best marketing tool.

When patients feel heard, cared for, and well handled, they reward you with continued business and referrals. But if you come across as distracted, distant, or gruff, you’ll lose patients—not just the ones in your office right now, but also those referrals down the road. When patients are paying out of pocket, they expect more. Unsatisfied, they’ll take their business elsewhere—no matter how good you are as a clinician. It takes so much more than good technical work to achieve private practice success.

Building a successful mindset is more than just having a great attitude and effective bedside manner. In the end, it’s all about vision and planning.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

3 Mistakes in Private Practice Building

Private Practice Building Mistakes: 3 Self-Sabotaging Behaviors That Will Kill Your Private Practice

Most People Are Making These 3 Private Practice Building Mistakes. Are You?

We’ve all heard about “self-sabotaging” behaviors—in our personal lives, in the context of career advice, and maybe in terms relationships. But did you know that there are self-sabotaging behaviors in the world of private practice building?

These attitudes and actions can be devastating to the health of your private practice. Why? Because in business, and particularly in the area of private practice building, the definition of self-sabotaging behaviors is anything that gets in the way of your long-term business goals.

Are you guilty of getting in your own way when it comes to private practice building? Of course, none of us are doing it perfectly… but the key is to be doing it effectively, and to avoid the major pitfalls.

Here are the top 3 self-sabotaging behaviors in private practice building, and suggestions for how you can avoid them.

#1: Waiting for the perfect moment

Sometimes we get so focused on taking action “at the right moment” that our perfectionism gets in the way of business growth.

In truth, ANY action—no matter how small—is better in the long term than continued inaction. In other words, when you don’t act, your lack of action is a choice that plays against your business goals.

#2: Micromanaging your team

You’re the captain of this ship, so of course you want to make sure you’ll stay on course. It’s tempting to try to accomplish this way-finding by being on top of your staff day in and day out, watching them like a hawk. But from a long-term view, this leads to resentment and high turnover—not the results you want in private practice building!

A better approach is to make your presence known in every area of your business, but in a manner that emphasizes your trust in your staff. Your team will feel that you’re involved and aware of their issues without the stranglehold of micromanaging.

#3: Trying to get all of your business learning from books

You know the importance of learning and growing in your private practice building efforts. Too often, though, you probably rely on reading books and articles as your main source of information.

Reading is certainly a convenient way to approach continuing education, since you can fit it into your schedule as needed. But there are a number of problems with this approach to private practice building. The main issue is that books and articles about private practice are aimed at a very general audience, and they detail someone else’s techniques for private practice building—which may not be applicable to your business or your unique situation as a private practice owner.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

Marketing Rules for Private Practice

Every Private Practice Owner Should Add This Key Success Factor Right Away

Here’s how to stay ahead of the game as a private practice owner. You can take proactive steps to make sure you’re driving the growth of your business, instead of letting overwhelm drive you into the ground.

You already know that owning and managing a private practice is a multifaceted job. In fact, it’s not just one job; every successful private practice owner performs multiple jobs over the course of a week, from staff management to marketing—oh, and being an excellent clinician, too!

Your clinical skill is the foundation of your business, but it can’t be your only focus. Even with a highly skilled staff to support you, it’s essential for you to be a core part of your practice, not just in the exam room or behind a desk, but with a presence in every aspect of your office.

With all of these responsibilities looming every day, how can the private practice owner avoid becoming overwhelmed? We all know that feelings of overwhelm can lead to distraction, procrastination, and falling behind on everything from office visits to paperwork—all of which has a negative ripple effect on your staff and the health of your business.

The essential factor in your success will be a methodical and proactive approach to the health of your business. As a private practice owner, you have to avoid the trap of staying busy but accomplishing little that benefits your long-range vision for your private practice. In short, you need a game plan, and you need to schedule time in EVERY day to follow through.

If you only make ONE improvement in your approach, it should be the addition of time slots during your week that are dedicated to business-related training materials. This doesn’t just mean being in your office and having a pile of things to read on your desk. For maximum effectiveness, make these hours work for you by isolating yourself with the materials—no cell phone or taking office calls, and absolutely no disturbance allowed except in a true emergency.

And it’s not enough to simply read through training materials. Know your learning style, take notes in a way that is meaningful for you, and find ways to implement what you’ve learned immediately so that it becomes part of your experience, not just intellectual knowledge. When you put new learnings into practice, you’ll be truly learning, and that’s what helps your private practice to grow.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

 

 

When It Comes to Productivity in Your Specialty Practice, Are You Just Spinning Your Wheels?

Specialty Practice Isn’t About Productivity—Unless You’re Producing The Right Kind of Work to Sustain Your Long-Term Vision

You work hard, every single day, to keep your specialty practice going—all the moving parts that are inherent in managing a business. You show up with a good positive can-do attitude and put in the hours. You try to make every day as productive as possible, with something to show for it all when you close up the doors at the end of the day. You read the time management and productivity books that tell you how to stay on top of your inbox and touch base with all of the facets of your business.

You’re putting in all the elements they told you about: hard work, passion and enthusiasm, willingness to problem-solve.

But, in the end, does any of that really matter?

There’s so much more to a sustainable specialty practice than just greasing the day-to-day mechanisms to keep it running. It’s not enough to simply work in your business, as if you were an employee. You’re the mastermind of your specialty practice, the source of its true viability. Without a clear long-term vision, when it comes down to it, you’re just spinning your wheels.

What you need is clarity, access to relevant decision-making information, and the kind of high-level business skills that will allow you create a customized path to sustainability and profitability. In other words, you need a road map to success in specialty private practice.

Otherwise, you’ll be lost in the wilderness of day-to-day decisions, never seeing the big picture of where your specialty practice is headed. If you want to be the one driving your practice, instead of simply being driven by external circumstances and the endless nagging needs of daily tasks, you’ve got to climb into the driver’s seat.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

physical therapy business

Are All Your Marketing Efforts Going to Waste in Your Physical Therapy Business?

For Your Physical Therapy Business to Thrive, You Need to Be Able to Distinguish Between Features and Benefits.

There are many factors at play in creating and growing a thriving physical therapy business. But without a deep understanding of one key marketing concept, I can almost guarantee that your practice will not be sustainable.

Here is the most important factor in successfully marketing your physical therapy business: features versus benefits.

In short, features are facts (the “what”), and benefits are the reasons why those facts solve your client’s problem (the “why”).

On the surface, the difference looks pretty simple to understand. The thing is, it can be hard for many physical therapy business owners to put that understanding into practice when it comes to developing a consistent marketing message. Sometimes, what we view as key information just ends up making a potential client feel “talked at” instead of understood.

As a physical therapy business owner, you have to present your services as the ideal solution to your client’s pain. Many private practice owners make the mistake of describing abstract concepts, such as the details of their training and credentials or the jargon associated with certain manual manipulations. This approach misses the point, though.

A potential client who is searching the Web or asking friends for a referral is likely not looking for the use of any particular training or technique. What is he or she searching for? An end to pain and discomfort. So that’s where your marketing message needs to focus.

Does your marketing message convey the relief that clients will feel after working with you? If that’s not the focus of your marketing efforts for your physical therapy practice, you can bet that some other physical therapist in your area is using that tactic to successfully draw in new clients.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

Marketing Your Specialty Practice

Private Practice Has Two Public Faces: Your Website and Your Reception Desk

In Your Private Practice, Are There Public Barriers to Finding and Retaining New Patients?

You’ve probably given a lot of thought to customer service for your existing patients and marketing avenues to find new ones. But are you overlooking the two most significant public faces of your private practice?

In short, your website and your reception desk are key areas of your practice that you can’t afford to ignore.

Your Private Practice Website

Sometimes it’s easy to get caught up in thinking about search engine optimization (SEO) for your website—making sure that patients who are searching for your specialty in your area will find you first. But don’t forget to think about what patients will find on your site when they get there! If they click away, you’ve wasted all your SEO efforts.

In many cases, your website will be the first impression of your practice for new patients. What does it tell them about your business? Remember, there’s the actual content of the site (the text itself) and then there are the subtle aspects that have psychological influence—the colors and images you present, the professional (or amateur) look of your site, and the amount of care that goes into the text so that it is clear and compelling—but not pushy.

Take a long look at your private practice website. Is it clean and simple? Is information easy to find? Does it answer the small questions that new patients will have, like how to find your office and whether their insurance will be filed? Does it answer their bigger questions, like why they should choose your office over someone else’s?

Optimizing Your Reception Desk

We sometimes talk about the reception “desk” as if it were an object. Of course, there’s more to reception than an actual desk, or even the people who staff it. The reception desk, in a sense, is a process. It’s how patients get greeted when they walk in the door, whether they are new or ongoing clients. It’s the atmosphere of the entire office, not just the waiting area. It’s also the experience that patients have when they call your office, whether it’s the first call about a new consultation or a question about billing.

As a process, the reception desk provides three aspects of customer service:

  1. Making a smooth transition from website to office
  2. Meeting the patient’s needs during the visit
  3. Following up after the visit

Do you know how that process feels to your patients? (Have you surveyed them, and continually asked for feedback, to find out?) Consider giving these questions at least as much consideration as your marketing budget or payroll issues, because without the answers to these questions, your practice may not be sustainable in the long term.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

Areas of Improvement for Private Practice

Private Practice Owners Must Read This: How to Turn Your Biggest Weakness Into an Asset

Write Down This Key Advice for All Private Practice Owners—Instead of Ignoring the Business Areas Where You’re Weakest, Outsource Those Tasks So They Become Strengths. Here’s How to Do It Effectively.

Our culture tends to foster a go-it-alone mentality. You know, just pull yourself up by your bootstraps and be willing to learn anything and go the extra mile—that’s how you gain success in any business. Private practice owners tend to take this to heart!

But the truth is that by trying to handle it all yourself, you’re spreading your resources too thin. In the end, successful private practice owners make their practices succeed by building an incredible team. And that’s more than just the staff in your office that you see every day. Your team can include freelance professionals who handle mundane or specialized tasks for your practice so that you can focus on your strengths.

By outsourcing your greatest weakness, you’re raising the bar. Instead of expecting that those tasks will be handled “well enough” (i.e., in an average way) through your own efforts, you can build a relationship with trusted professionals who will far outperform you—and thus, let you focus on YOUR work with patients, where you really shine.

The outsourcing process, in a nutshell, is actually very simple.

First, identify which tasks are currently a liability to your practice because you can’t or won’t do them effectively. For many private practice owners, these could include payroll, marketing, or website management.

Next, research two to three options for getting these tasks done by someone outside your office. This is probably the easiest step. Even if there aren’t great resources in your local area, consider that many tasks can be done remotely, thanks to the Internet. Private practice owners can form a relationship with remote freelancers by talking with them through Skype or teleconference software.

Meanwhile, you’ll notice during this research phase that you will begin to have all sorts of mental objections to outsourcing. Make a note of these thoughts. Some of them may have validity (see the next paragraph) while others are based on emotion, not a logical justification. Talk with someone you trust who can help you think it through.

Next, before you make a hiring decision, do what you can to minimize risk—and there’s a lot you can do. Ask other private practice owners and related professionals for recommendations, instead of trying to reinvent the wheel.

When you find a freelancer you like, ask for the contact information of satisfied clients (and call at least one to confirm the testimonial!) and ask to view samples of the freelancer’s previous work. When you’re ready to hire, be sure you start with a written contract for one small, quick job. That will allow you to evaluate the freelancer’s work for yourself before making a substantial financial commitment.

It’s possible to be weak in a significant area of business and still succeed, as long as you’re able to put together a strong team.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

distinguish your physical therapy business

How to Distinguish Your Physical Therapy Business: Stand Out from the Competition

In building your physical therapy business, the number one tool is distinguishing yourself from competitors. These tips can help.

One of the core aspects of marketing for a physical therapy business is to stand out from the competition. That’s easy to say, but how do you actually do it?

Here are 4 key approaches to distinguishing your physical therapy business from your competitors so that you’ll attract new patients and gain referrals.

1. Market to your ideal customer, not to “everybody.”

Spend some time identifying the kind of patient you really want to attract to your physical therapy practice. Think about demographics—things like that person’s age, income level, and education. Now think about psychographics, particularly that person’s buying behaviors. For example, do they always treat themselves to luxury items because “I deserve it,” or do they pinch pennies and prioritize just a few big-ticket purchases after careful thought?

Make sure that what you’re offering is specifically aimed at a narrow target market. The physical therapy business down the street is most likely spreading their marketing budget thin by trying to appeal to “everybody,” so you can stand out by only trying to attract a very specific group of people.

2. Offer service packages with distinctive, compelling names.

Packages make it easier for patients to decide how to purchase your services. Too much choice can be overwhelming, so make it easy by bundling services together. Then give each of those packages a name that conveys their benefits. In essence, you’re coming up with branding for each package.

3. Look for what your competitors don’t offer, and do that.

Do a little research. You should not only know WHO your competitors are, but also HOW they operate. Notice if there are any holes in what they offer. Now find a way to provide a service that addresses the gaps. This could be something specific to your physical therapy practice as a clinician, or it could be as simple as offering a payment plan when your competitor insists on pay up front every time.

4. Follow up.

This is such a simple concept, but it’s so important for the long-term sustainability of your physical therapy business. Strive to be a presence in your patients’ lives. For example, make a personal follow-up call the week after an initial appointment to see how your new patient is doing, and get feedback on their visit. Send patients a token birthday gift, something small but surprising. (Don’t just send a birthday postcard, since everyone from their dentist to their auto mechanic is already doing that.) Be memorable in every transaction.

How do you distinguish your private practice in your marketing? Join the conversation on Facebook.

 

self-care for private practice ownership

The Importance of Self-Care in Private Practice Ownership

Are You Practicing Good Self-Care? Why This Matters So Much for Private Practice Ownership

You probably tell your patients that they need to take good care of their bodies in order to function well and cope with the stress of illness or chronic pain. But are you practicing what you preach? Many private practice owners don’t follow their own advice!

Your private practice may be as unique as your individual human experience—but the basics of self-care are the same for everyone, doctor or patient.

Just in case you’ve forgotten, here are a few of the most basic needs you have to meet on a regular basis for optimum health: Adequate sleep. Good nutrition—not fast food and caffeine. Fulfilling relationships. Aerobic exercise. Time alone to recharge (for introverts) or invigorating time with others (for extroverts). Spiritual connection and a sense of meaning.

What does your health have to do with private practice ownership? Think of yourself, the owner and director of your practice, as the queen bee of your professional hive—the office and staff you’ve built. The hive depends entirely on you to survive. No matter how hard the worker drones are flying around and gathering resources, if the queen bee is in poor health, the welfare of the entire hive is at stake.

You’re not a machine or a robot, and you can’t keep going endlessly day after day without regular recharging, both physically and mentally. If you’re spending each day just powering through, you are probably not doing your best work (or being the best director for your staff). But if you show up at the office each day refueled and ready for anything, you’ll be able to provide effective leadership that truly builds a sustainable private practice.

Take a few moments right now to consider your self-care practices. Which areas are going well? Which ones need a little nurturing? Come up with at least two types of self-care that you’re going to focus on this week that will help build a long-term future for your private practice ownership.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team

Doctor listening to patient

Why the Most Important Skill in Private Practice Ownership is Listening

Are you a good listener? Learning to listen effectively may be the best thing you can do for sustainable private practice ownership.

Most of us think of listening in a very general way. In our minds, being a “good listener” is something that applies to helping a friend in need. Or perhaps we think that good listening is about being obedient in school, and we’re too old for that now. It also applies to private practice ownership!

In truth, good listening skills are vital to the success of your business, the satisfaction of your staff, and even your own ongoing sense of purpose.

First of all, listening to your patients is the key to effective marketing. If your marketing strategy is based on anything other than what your patients want and need, it will fail. This applies to keeping current patients (and getting those highly desired referrals!) as well as convincing prospective new patients to give your practice a try.

Second, your staff needs you to listen well to their concerns as well as to their positive feedback. Staff satisfaction provides a lot of useful data about which of your business systems are working well and which ones need improvement. And, of course, staff morale is important to the overall health of your practice because it will make or break customer service—which keeps patients coming in the door.

Third, and possibly most important of all, you have to be able to listen to your own intuition about whether your practice is thriving or suffering. Remember that in private practice ownership, what matters most is your vision for the practice and your passion for making it succeed. Without those driving factors, your business will be running on fumes, and that won’t allow it to go the distance and be sustainable.

Consider what you can do today, this month, and this year to be a better listener for your practice. Ask your patients, your staff, and yourself for feedback. Don’t forget to check in with your colleagues, too, by joining the ongoing conversation on our Facebook page.

 

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team 

What Do You Promise to Patients?

Did You Ever Make a Promise to a Patient?

 

This is an area that far too many clinicians regardless of the specialty get into trouble with. It is so important to understand that the only real promise to patients you or I can and should make to patients is that we will do our very best to help them.

That’s it, nothing more. To make promises of anything more is just fraught with peril!

Furthermore, it’s not good informed consent it’s also grossly unfair to yourself and your entire team.

As the old saying goes under promise and over deliver. It’s a far better strategy for practicing long-term.

I know there are many legal ramifications and obligations too…

Let me tell you what I’ve heard as a consultant.

“This WILL Fix You For Good Mrs Jones!”

“I know Jimmy, you have been sick for years but with this NEW treatment if you are NOT FIXED in 3 weeks you can have all your money back!”

Huh?

Promise to Patients?

Yes!

But lets get real. Why not be 100% honest and say something like…

“We will do all we can to help you to the best of our ability…these are the risks associated with treatment…these are the risks if you do nothing…”

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join our team experts for a free strategy session HERE

 

Have a great day!

the PPW team 

follow-ups in private practice

The Power of Personal Follow-Ups to Build Your Private Practice: How to Use Personalized Marketing in a Digital World

You’ll have an edge on your competition when you follow up consistently and personally with your patients.

It’s a sad fact that most private practice owners don’t bother to follow up with their patients—and those who do, often are following up in an impersonal way. That’s bad news for those business owners, but it means you have a golden opportunity to tweak your practice follow-up to be more personal and therefore more effective.

Follow-up opportunities happen constantly, and many of them take place before your patient even walks out the door. For example, when your reception staff is checking out a patient after the visit, that’s a prime chance to get feedback. Does your staff inquire personally how the visit went and if there’s anything they can do for your patient? Does your staff direct the patient to a comment card? Or do they just not ask for feedback at all? You can get very strong and detailed feedback immediately after a visit, which is more valuable to your practice.

Now let’s consider post-visit follow-up. Imagine that a new patient has a consultation with you on Monday morning, but this person doesn’t make an additional appointment at the desk—she says to your staff that she will schedule an appointment later. Does your staff know how to handle a situation like this? Do they tell you about it in a timely way, or do they passively wait for the patient to call the office? Do you expect your staff to follow up with new patients or do you personally reach out to these patients with a phone call?

Just for a moment, put yourself in that patient’s shoes. Which scenario makes you feel special and cared for? Which scenario makes you feel ignored and like a number instead of a person? There’s a frequently quoted aphorism attributed to Maya Angelou: People forget what you do or what you said, but they never forget how you made them feel.

When patients feel that you care about them, they come back, and they refer family and friends. And that’s the bottom line of private practice building.

I invite you to visit here frequently for more tips about creating a sustainable private practice!

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

the PPW team 

Arachnoiditis

What is Arachnoiditis and How Can You Help?

As a specialty practice emphasizing the relief of chronic pain, you will encounter patients who suffer from arachnoiditis.

Unfortunately the number of these cases is growing by leaps and bounds.

The cause is thought to be at least in a large part due to the rising use of intraspinal injections.

As we both know, now a days and too often intraspinal injections are used as a first-line rather than the last line therapy for back pain, radiculitis etc.

The net result can be patients who are injured, or suffer severe adverse reactions.

These reactions can range from chronic back pain to unrelenting extremity and spine pain and even paralysis.

There is some concern that preservatives as well as the variety of drugs used in intraspinal injections can cause autoimmune reactions, which can lead to the development of more serious conditions including chemical hypersensitivity.

But the worst effect of course is, the chronic and debilitating and unrelenting pain that these patients suffer from.

As one of our trained clinicians, though you have tools right at your fingertips, which may be able to help even the most difficult patients.

Arachnoiditis patients present cases that will test all of your skills.

You need to of course be sure to start with a very thorough evaluation. Depending upon your expertise, develop a rational but powerful treatment plan using all the tools we have given you. Alternatively refer to one of your colleagues better equipped and trained to help these patients.

There is even a place for lifestyle and behavioral therapies in the treatment of the arachnoiditis patient. This is of course due to the significant life destruction they have experience.

Commonly, your office can serve as an oasis for these patients providing all types of information, which they are not getting anywhere else.

If you’re not familiar with arachnoiditis, we will be providing our clients additional continuing education material on this.

If you thought Neuropathy patients were challenging, you haven’t seen anything until you tackle some of these cases.

The good news is you can offer help to many of these patients.

But the first thing to do is start reaching out in your own practice and in your own community!

Communicate the value of what you are doing a daily basis.

Emphasize the need for a rational conservative approach to spine pain and possible arachnoiditis prevention, doing all of this despite traditional pain clinics emphasis on invasive and potentially dangerous injection therapy.

Above all, expand your expertise and learn to truly help the arachnoiditis patient.

We wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join our team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

Loyal Patients in Private Practice

Diabetic Neuropathy Patients

Treating Patients With Diabetic Neuropathy

If you treat Diabetic Neuropathy Patients chances are you are no stranger to making diagnoses of neuropathy. While some patients (even those who do have nerve damage) might experience no symptoms at all, about 60 to 70 percent of diabetics experience pain, soreness, loss of sensation, tingling in the extremities, and even digestive problems—or other conditions related to organ complications—all symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Diabetic Neuropathy is one of the most common causes of neuropathy overall.

A patient’s risk of developing diabetes-related neuropathy actually increases with age and extenuating health considerations (such as being overweight), partially because patients who have problems with glucose control for extended periods of time—25 years or more—are more susceptible.

So, what causes Diabetic Neuropathy symptoms? Research is occasionally unclear on the subject, but it is generally agreed that exposure to high blood glucose (high blood sugar) has a negative effect on nerve condition. Of course, this is in addition to other conditions or lifestyle factors commonly associated with causing or exacerbating diabetic neuropathy, such as injury, metabolic inconsistencies, inherited traits, or substance abuse.

There are a few kinds of neuropathy associated with diabetes, the most common being peripheral neuropathy (this is the type usually referred to when people simply say “neuropathy” but we’ll get to the other types in a moment). Peripheral neuropathy is characterized by pain, numbness, tingling, and loss of motor function, among other sensation-related symptoms. This type is written about extensively, and can greatly impact quality of life for its sufferers. Most treatments available to medical practitioners target peripheral neuropathy the good news is, there are plenty of ways for you to treat this type.

Focal and proximal Diabetic Neuropathy result in muscle weakness and pain, and typically target a specific nerve grouping. These types of neuropathy are commonly characterized by weakness in the legs, causing difficulty standing and walking. This type of neuropathy often accompanies peripheral neuropathy, so be on the lookout for patients who experience weakness alongside loss of sensation or soreness.

Autonomic neuropathy, as the name implies, causes changes in autonomic bodily functions. These include bowel and bladder functions, sexual responses, and digestion. Autonomic neuropathy can be life-threatening in extreme cases, as it also affects nerves that serve the heart, lungs, and eyes. Especially troubling to diabetic patients is the resulting condition of hypoglycemia unawareness, which can reduce the symptoms most diabetics associate with low glucose.

It is recommended for any diabetic patients to receive at least an annual foot exam. If neuropathy has already been diagnosed, a patient’s feet should be examined much more frequently. Additional to diabetic amputation concerns, you should test your patient’s protective sensation by pricking their foot with a pin, or running monofilament across their skin. If your patient has lost protective sensation, he or she could be at risk to develop sores that might not heal properly, leading to infection. If you have any questions about the proper methods to use in examining diabetic patients for neuropathy, contact NeuropathyDR®. We can be sure you have the tools and knowledge you need!

For other types of neuropathy, properly-trained clinicians should perform a check of heart rate variability to detect how a patient’s heart rate changes in response to changes in blood pressure and posture. Ultrasound imaging is also useful to diagnose autonomic neuropathies and to ensure other internal organs such as the kidneys and bladder are functioning properly.

To control diabetic neuropathy, it is important to advise patients to maintain a tight blood sugar control and a healthy diet (this methodology is advisable for diabetics in general, of course). Even if a patient does not have symptoms of neuropathy, regular checkups are wise. NeuropathyDR® can train you to spot warning signs of factors that could endanger your patients’ nerve function or even be life-threatening. In addition, we can help you treat pain symptoms by providing valuable information about appropriate medications.

If your patients have diabetes, they are at risk! Don’t let neuropathic symptoms go unchecked. Remember, the sooner neuropathy is diagnosed, the easier it will be to treat and to slow the progression of this degenerative condition. Our NeuropathyDR® clinicians are trained to identify the various types of neuropathy and recommend the treatments that help their patients retain their quality of life.

If you have any questions about specialty practice development for chronic pain including diabetic Neuropathy GO TO: NeuropathyDRProfessionals.com

We wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

 

 

Private Practice Building And Your Reputation

Private Practice Building & Reputation Defense

As a private practice owner, just like in any business you need to be very concerned about malicious attacks both on and off-line, most especially in the online arena.

Unless you have systems in place to monitor how your name, your intellectual assets, as well as your practice reputation are defended, you could find yourself doing damage control.

Like it or not it is so easy for the disgruntled patient, perhaps even a competitor or someone you don’t even know to launch malicious attacks against your good work.

Of course we’ve all heard about password theft as well as other online theft. Now I think that private practice owners are particularly easy targets because we often simply are not monitored and thus not protected. This becomes even more important as you develop more places where you were visible online, most especially the social media.

But let’s start with some basics. How often do you search for yourself, and any business or personal assets you have online?

This is a particularly good starting point and it is something we recommend all private practice members such as yourself, be doing on a regular basis. There are also good paid services you may want to consider investing in for reputation defense as well.

This has become such a serious issue, as even paid defense services sometimes are not fool-proof.

 

We wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

The PPW team

practice building advice

Customer Service Goes Beyond Serving Patients

You may think your private practice is pretty good at customer service for patients. But you can take it to a whole new level when your staff learns to serve each other.

Do you know a lot about customer service? It’s definitely the bottom line when it comes to marketing a private practice. But what you may not realize is that customer service isn’t just for patients and new prospects.

Imagine a world in which your staff treats EACH OTHER like valued customers. A world where you’re able to retain staff and keep morale at a steady high.

You can create that world! And your patients will sense a positive shift in your practice culture—which will keep them coming back.

A private practice with a customer service culture has several elements working for it, which you can easily begin to emulate.

First of all, it’s the simplest things that change company culture. “Please” and “thank you” go a long way toward building morale and helping every staff member feel valued. You can suggest at your next staff meeting that everyone remember to use these simple words with each other, not just with clients. But more importantly, you can model this new behavior for your staff. They’ll do what you do, not what you say.

Second, practice listening with respect, not impatience. Too often we are so busy and wrapped in details that we barely acknowledge staff with a nod. What if you made it a practice to always make eye contact, listen fully, and value that person’s contribution to your workday in every exchange? You don’t have to do it perfectly, but there’s a good chance that every respectful listening exchange will have a ripple effect among your staff.

Finally, find ways to offer timely feedback, both positive and constructive. Begin building feedback opportunities into the workweek rather than saving them for performance reviews. Most important, be aware that feedback shouldn’t come just from you as the private practice owner, but from staff member to staff member so that they are supporting each other. Teach them to “catch someone doing something right” and provide concrete ways to share those moments.

What have you learned in your practice about customer service? 

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

JPH

Content Marketing for Your Private Practice

Change Your Marketing Mindset to Bring In More Referrals

How to Transform Your Private Practice Marketing to Reach Your Ideal Customer

Do you love marketing?

Most private practice owners think of marketing as a necessary evil—a dreaded chore that must be done in order to get new patients in the door. But you can distinguish yourself with private practice marketing that genuinely attracts new business because of the positive energy you’ve poured into it.

Think of how it feels to walk into a dentist’s office, for example. There are some pretty standard things that you expect because they’re the same in almost every dental office: popular magazines, photos of smiling people on the walls, an easy listening station piped into the waiting room.

But imagine that you walk into a dental office and experience pleasant surprises. What if the dentist stepped out into the waiting room personally to introduce himself and say how nice it was to meet you? What if, at the end of your first appointment, the office staff gave you two $5 gift cards—one for you and one to pass on to a friend? You’d feel that the dentist and his staff truly wanted to connect with you and make your day nicer.

The same can be true of your private practice marketing efforts. When you approach marketing as a pleasant opportunity to make connections with new patients, rather than as a mundane or tiresome duty, your actions will bring in more business.

Here’s one more way to look at it: think of marketing as a form of customer service (for new customers who don’t know you personally yet). Put yourself in the customer’s shoes. Who would you rather have serving you? The tired customer service rep who is merely going through the motions? Or someone who reaches out to you sincerely and asks how to best serve you today?

Patients can tell when your marketing is heartfelt, and when it’s just going through the motions. In private practice marketing, choose to make real connections every time and you’ll enjoy better referrals.

I wish you the best along your journeys!

Want to learn more about how to build your private practice?

Then Join my team experts for a free strategy session HERE

Have a great day!

JPH